Research principle – Metro Research http://metroresearch.org/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 01:45:41 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://metroresearch.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/cropped-icon-32x32.png Research principle – Metro Research http://metroresearch.org/ 32 32 The Search For The Gray Area Season 3 – Playlist – Reluctant Habits https://metroresearch.org/the-search-for-the-gray-area-season-3-playlist-reluctant-habits/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 00:34:09 +0000 https://metroresearch.org/the-search-for-the-gray-area-season-3-playlist-reluctant-habits/ The third season of my audio drama, The gray area, is probably the most ambitious project I’ve ever attempted, and given the multiple time periods and multiple universes, it required a lot of research. The following is a list of books I have read so far. I estimate that I am about 65% in my […]]]>

The third season of my audio drama, The gray area, is probably the most ambitious project I’ve ever attempted, and given the multiple time periods and multiple universes, it required a lot of research. The following is a list of books I have read so far. I estimate that I am about 65% in my research. I still have a few dozen books to read (and I have the massive stacks to prove it!). I hope to complete the scripts and start production in 2023.

Mid-Century America:
Dorothee Baker, young man with the horn
Charles Bukowski, rye ham
Eric Dregni, let’s go bowling
Bret Harvey, The 50s
William Hitchcock, Eisenhower’s age
Andrew Hurley, Diners, Bowling Alleys and Trailer Parks
Kenneth T. Jackson, crabgrass border
James Kaplan, Franck: the voice
James Kaplan, Sinatra
Jack Kerouac, The tramps of Dharma
Robert Lenzer, The great Getty
Shawn Levy, Confidential Rat Pack
William Manchester, The Glory and the Dream
Harry & Bonaro Overstreet, The strange tactic of extremism
Doug Schmidt, They came to the bowl
Howard Stallings, The Big Book of Bowling
gay tale, Fame and obscurity
gay tale, The bridge
Nick Tosh, dinosaur

1977:
Michael Azzarad, Our band could be your life
Lester Bangs, Mainlines, blood parties and bad taste
Lester Bangs, Psychic reactions and carburetor droppings
Jim DeRogatis, let it blur
Nelson George, The Death of Rhythm and Blues
Nelson George, American hip hop
Duncan Hannah, 20th century boy
Anthony Haden-Guest, Studio 54, Disco and night culture
Tim Laurent, love save the day
McNeil and Gillian McCain Bequest, please kill me
Leonard Michaels, The stories collected
Richard Meltzer, The aesthetics of rock
Jon Savage, Dream of England
Pierre Shapiro, Change the rhythm
Patti Smith, just children
Paul Wilson, Central Square: The Paul Lynde Story
James Wolcott, Luck

Anti-consumerism:
John Brooks, Showing off in America
John Brooks, The Go-Go years
Paul Fussel, Wrong
Holiday Ryan, trust me i’m lying

Dark Studies:
Arna Bontremps, black thunder
Sarah Broom, The yellow house
Jessie Redmon Fauset, Plum bun
Rodolphe Fisher, The Conjure-Man dies
Nelson George, post soul nation
Langston Hughes, Not without laughter
Nella Larsen, Quicksands
Claude MacKay, Welcome to Harlem
Trussie McMillanCottom, Thick
Ismael Reed, Complete Works
George Scuhlyer, More black
Harvard Sitkoff, A New Deal for Blacks
Wallace Thurman, Blackest in the bay
John Toomer, Cane
Mary Helen Washington, The other blacklist
Albert Woodfox, Lonely
C. Vann Woodward, The strange career of Jim Crow
Richard Wright, The Man Who Lived Underground
Richard Wright, the stranger

Lusitania
Robert D. Ballade, Explore the Lusitania
Greg King and Penny Wilson, Lusitania
Jennifer Kewley Drasrau, Lusitania, tragedy or war crime?
Erik Larsen, dead alarm clock
Fionbarr Moore, et al, RMS Lusitania: the story of a shipwreck
Diana Preston, Lusitania: an epic tragedy
David Ramsey, Lusitania: Saga and myth

Relationships/Sexuality:
Brian Aldiss, The Horatio Stubbs Saga
Allan Berube, Come out under fire
Rachel Devlin, Relative privacy
John D’Emilo and Estelle B. Freedman, Intimate Matters
Martin Duberman, Stone wall
Alex Espinoza, Cruise
Cynthia Heimel, But enough about you
Cynthia Heimel, Sex tips for girls
Gayle E. Pitman, The Stonewall Riots: Taking to the Streets
Anka Radakovitch, Explorations
Anka Radakovitch, The Wild Girls Club
Christopher Ryan and Cacilda Jetha, Sex at dawn
Stejpan Sejac, sun stone
Lisa Taddeo, three women
gay tale, Your neighbor’s wife
Lisa Wade, american hookup
Moira Weigel, labor of love

Great Depression:
Caroline Bird, The invisible scar
Robert S. McElvaine, The great Depression
Amity Shlaes, the forgotten man
Terkel Studs, hard times

Philosophy/Technology:
Joel Beckerman, The sonic boom
Nick Billon, Twitter outbreak
John Braithwaite, Crime, Shame and Reintegration
Alan Ehrenhold, The lost city
Claire Evans, Broadband
Matt Fortnow, The NFT Handbook
David J. Hand, The Improbability Principle
Christopher Lash, The culture of narcissism
Carlo Rovelli, The order of time
Camilla Russo, The infinite machine
Lucy Health, Low lifespan
Laura Shin, The Cryptopians

War:
Pat Barker, Regeneration
A. Scott Berg, World War I and America
Vera Brittain, Youth Will
Elizabeth Cobbs, Hello girls
Paul Fussel, The Boys’ Crusade
Paul Fussel, The Great War and modern memory
Paul Fussel, war time
Robert Graves, Goodbye to it all
Stephen L. Harris, Harlem’s Hell Fighters
James Jones, From here to eternity
Ernest R. May, The World War and American Isolation 1914-1917
Tim O’Brien, Chasing Cacciato
Tim O’Brien, If I died in a combat zone
Tim O’Brien, The things they carried
Siegfried Sassoon, Memoirs of a Fox Hunter
Siegfried Sassoon, Memoirs of an Infantry Officer
Rebecca West, The Return of the Soldier

Women’s rights:
Soraya Chemaly, Rage becomes her
Anne Fessler, The girls who left
Greenhouse Linda, Justice on the brink
Jane L. Mansbridge, Why we lost the ERA
Patricia C. Miller, The worst of times
Michel Oberman, His body, our laws
Sylvia Plath, The Complete Diaries of Sylvia Plath
Rene Rosen, girl in white collar
Elaine Showalter, female disease
Rebecca Traister, good and crazy
Daniel K. Williams, Unborn Child Advocates
Bob Woodward and Scott Armstrong, Brothers






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Geragogy: learning in old age https://metroresearch.org/geragogy-learning-in-old-age/ Sun, 18 Sep 2022 09:10:00 +0000 https://metroresearch.org/geragogy-learning-in-old-age/ In the 1990s when I first studied gerontology and geriatrics, the field in Malta was still in its infancy. At the time, the Institute of Gerontology, created in 1989, welcomed candidates from afar to study this developing field. People asked me what gerontology is and I felt immensely proud to spread knowledge about it, as […]]]>

In the 1990s when I first studied gerontology and geriatrics, the field in Malta was still in its infancy. At the time, the Institute of Gerontology, created in 1989, welcomed candidates from afar to study this developing field.

People asked me what gerontology is and I felt immensely proud to spread knowledge about it, as well as the fact that I had started to invest myself in this fascinating discipline.

Fast forward to the 2000s and I found myself once again delving into another aspect of this ever-evolving field, this time that of geragogy, specifically cultural geragogy. So people are now giving me puzzled and questioning looks: “Geragogy?

What is geragogy?

While most are familiar with the terms ‘pedagogy’ and ‘andragogy’, ‘geragogy’ is still new to many. The term refers to the management of teaching and learning specifically for older people and is now a recognized term associated with teaching and learning later in life (Findsen & Formosa, 2011).

This field of study, which derives from adult education and has now become a scientific discipline in its own right, attempts to research the best methodologies and best practices for teaching older adults, who naturally experience social, psychological and personal later in life (Formosa, 2012a, 2012b). It is about defining the unique characteristics of this stratum of society and offering justifications for specific teaching methodologies.

The word comes from the Greek roots geras, meaning old age, and agogus, meaning to guide or lead, and seems to be attributed to the German pedagogue Hans Mieskes in the early 1970s (Bubolz-Lutz, 2014).

In the meantime, the discipline has developed both as a science and as a practice. It deals with the development of learning and educational processes in older people. When discussing the establishment of these processes, two points of view should be kept in mind, namely both the point of view of the elderly themselves (education of the elderly) but also that of any person working with them (training to work with older people). In other words, self-learning in older people and planning and carrying out such educational work with older people.

The key principles

Various factors are suggested by different authors to make the learning experience as successful as possible. One author, Tambaum (2012), has cataloged the principles of geragogy from relevant literary sources. These included:

• Flexibility in learning and pace;

• Diversity in terms of sharing life experiences, using connections in learning new materials and reinforcing learned materials;

• Usefulness in terms of applicability;

• The modernity of means, tools, terms;

• Dynamism and independence;

• Security in the use of encouragement, respect and kindness;

• Feeling of achievement;

• Sustainability in metacognition and self-help;

• Friendly and informal atmosphere.

It should be remembered that older learners come from different backgrounds and experiences, so those from a working background and those with less literacy may particularly feel hesitant and nervous about any new learning experience. Offering choice and flexibility gives them some control. A very important principle in working with this target group – and one that cannot be overemphasized – is relationship building and respect.

It should be remembered that older learners come from different backgrounds and experiences, so those from a working background and those with less literacy may particularly feel hesitant and nervous about any new learning experience.

Moving on to other recommended strategies, Findsen and Formosa (2011) referred to the vast life experience of older adults that should be tapped into during the learning experience, in order to make the experience relevant to the particular cohort. Another interesting approach to learning for older adults is the use of peer learning, which has been shown in some studies (Choi, 2009) to be a very positive experience, especially when it involves is about group discussions.

Psychological, physical and sensory challenges must be taken into account, which requires a multimodal approach. The pace of learning must also be dictated by the older people themselves.

To go further, another emerging subfield of study that specifically includes arts and culture in the learning formula is cultural geragogy.

Cultural geragogy

Cultural geragogy is a relatively new discipline that builds on other disciplines such as gerontology, geragogy, educational sciences, and cultural education and management. It has become a growing field, with collaborations across European countries; an example is the European Network for Culture and Aging (officially operating from 2005 to 2008) and the not so distant European initiative Long Live Arts Manifesto (2016).

Cultural education through participation in arts and culture later in life is a key element of social inclusion, quality of life and well-being of older people.

In Germany, in the 1980s, the Institute for Education and Culture (IBK) in North Rhine-Westphalia began to place more emphasis on research into existing cultural work with older people. One of the main areas of research was the study of the impact of demographic change on the cultural sector, as well as the potential of arts education with this specific target group.

The IBK then founded Kubia (Competence Center for Cultural Education in Later Life) in 2008. In 2011, the IBK joined forces with Münster University of Applied Sciences to launch a new discipline Kulturgeragogik – cultural geragogy that aims to professionalize artistic and cultural work. with and for the elderly. The term was created for the new field at the time and followed the successful start of another subfield, that of geragogy music (Musikgeragogik).

The growing field of cultural geragogy seeks to address issues of cultural education in older people, both in content and structure, and to put them into practice. It seeks to answer didactic and methodological questions. It aims to professionalize the geragological methods involved via a database of evidence.

In conclusion, keep in mind that older people are both able and willing to learn! I feel privileged to have immersed myself in this exciting field, especially with the growing local awareness of cultural participation for people of all ages. My programs have included visual art dialogues, reading and discussion groups, and writing workshops. I believe all of this contributes significantly to primary prevention and cognitive stimulation, especially when the buzzword is now “creative aging”.

Priscilla Cassar is a speech therapist, gerontologist and cultural geragologist.

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Reality On Demand: Why Humans Aren’t Scientific Detectors https://metroresearch.org/reality-on-demand-why-humans-arent-scientific-detectors/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 15:54:44 +0000 https://metroresearch.org/reality-on-demand-why-humans-arent-scientific-detectors/ In court, people are convicted of crimes and sentenced to prison terms based on eyewitness accounts. However, scientific evidence is held to a higher standard. For a scientific claim to be considered credible, it must be based on quantitative data from fully mastered and mastered instruments. Unlike these measuring devices, eyewitness testimony could be biased […]]]>

In court, people are convicted of crimes and sentenced to prison terms based on eyewitness accounts. However, scientific evidence is held to a higher standard. For a scientific claim to be considered credible, it must be based on quantitative data from fully mastered and mastered instruments. Unlike these measuring devices, eyewitness testimony could be biased by wishful thinking, hallucinations, or ulterior motives. Like Winston Churchill Notedthe story depends on who writes it, which makes it difficult to extract a balanced description of physical reality based solely on reports from humans.

four centuries ago, Galileo was placed under house arrest. This act was intended to hide from public view the apparent evidence through the eyepiece of his telescope that the Earth is not at the center of the Universe. This act of censorship, of course, did not change the Earth’s orbit around the Sun, but it did allow mainstream dogma to dominate society until the evidence was impossible to hide because it was backed up by data from many other telescopes.

In today’s popularity contests, it’s important to remember that reality is what it is, no matter how many likes it gets on Twitter. We don’t get any “on-demand” version of reality we want as easy as uploading it to a streaming TV service; instruments similar to Galileo’s telescope do not change their readings based on popularity, preference, social pressure, prejudice, or ego.

While the legal system often encounters one-time events that cannot be replicated, science aims to verify empirical evidence by repeating experiments with ever better instruments and improved accuracy.

The underlying principle of modern science, founded by Galileo’s approach, is that a “Pooh” the interaction between the studied object and the measuring device, can be quantified and reproduced because devoid of the subjectivity inherent in human experience. The alternative “I-It” and “I you“the interactions discussed in the 1923 book”I and youby the philosopher Martin Buberapply to interactions with humans and are less straightforward to interpret than the quantifiable interaction between purely physical objects.

There are examples in which the human experience was later verified by a quantitative experimental setup. For example, the blue light emitted by charged particles when they travel faster than light through a medium was seen in 1934 through the eyes of Pavel Cherenkov and later confirmed by laboratory detectors.

Instruments are a reliable substitute for humans, not only for sensing and measuring processes, but also for analyzing data and drawing conclusions. In the future, data analysis may be dominated by artificial rather than natural intelligence, as it is less biased. The use of artificial intelligence (AI) algorithms is already widespread in the analysis of large data sets at the frontiers of scientific research, and it could extend to medical or legal evaluations. Nobel Prize-winning psychologist Daniel Kahneman suggested that “AI is going to trump” human assessments in all walks of life, and “how people are going to adapt to this is a fascinating problem.”

The distinction between eyewitness testimony or anecdotal evidence of compromised quality was the primary motivation for establishing the Galileo Project, inspired by Galileo’s approach of looking through telescopes to find evidence. Against the background of numerous reports on Unidentified Aerial Phenomena (UAP) in the sky from eyewitnesses and low-quality equipment, the project aims to collect new data based on a suite of fully calibrated and controlled state-of-the-art instruments. Data analysis will be performed by automated AI algorithms to minimize human bias.

As is routine in scientific research, the data will be open to the global community and the results will be published in peer-reviewed journals. The shift from anecdotal reports to scientifically rigorous data collection from well-understood instruments is a fundamental shift in UAP research, necessary to bring it into the mainstream of science.

The Galileo Project the team will test and calibrate its set of instruments In the coming months. Once the tests are complete, the research team will deploy the detection system to the desired location and collect new data by filming the sky in infrared, optics, radio and audio, starting in the spring. 2023.

The experimental team members met in the backyard of my house this weekend. It was gratifying to hear the latest update on the status of the project’s instruments. One of the most valuable members of the team that designed our audio detectors, Andy Mead, wrote to me after the meeting: “I am more convinced than ever that the Galileo Project is on the right track – I am extremely proud to be part of a team conducting this study in the right way, letting the scientific method and genuine curiosity drive the ship, sailing smoothly past the Twitterverse on our way to a data-driven destination. He added, “Allowing my curiosity to flow through my technical work on this project has been a highlight of my professional career to date.”



Andy’s grandfather was part of a secret World War II unit that was recently awarded the Congressional Gold Medal. The unit, named “The Phantom Armywas responsible for using science, technology, and creativity to deceive the German military about troop movements. In other words, this unit took advantage of the dubious nature of the human experiment, once again demonstrating that humans are not reliable scientific detectors. Andy’s grandfather was an electrical engineer in charge of audio part of the project. He then published an article “The Sonic Deception Facet of Electronic Warfare” in the Armed Forces Journal in 1981. The unit is estimated to have saved 15,000 to 30,000 lives through its use of technology.

The Congressional effort for the gold medal intensified around Andy’s initial involvement in the Galileo Project. Andy noted, “I didn’t miss the opportunity to help audio part of an extremely important project. Likewise, I work alongside an exceptional group of scientists, engineers, and creatives akin to the group that surrounded my grandfather… It is often said that history rhymes, and I am grateful to be able to honor sonic endeavors of my grandfather. with my own audio work on the Galileo project.

Although Andy’s lyrics reflect a “I-It” and “I you“perspective is the future”Pooh“data from his instruments that will be exciting to retrieve as evidence of what the UAP side of”This” could be. And in case some UAP represent sentient devices with AI, its related interaction with the Galileo Project the detectors would be even more interesting, potentially leading to our AI system interacting with their AI system. This would constitute a newAI-AIcategory which was not even imagined by Martin Buber.

Avi Loeb is head of the Galileo Project, founding director of the Harvard University – Black Hole Initiative, director of the Institute for Theory and Computation at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, and former chairman of the astronomy department of the Harvard University (2011 -2020). He chairs the Advisory Board for Project Breakthrough Starshot and is a former member of the President’s Advisory Council on Science and Technology and a former Chairman of the National Academies Board of Physics and Astronomy. He is the bestselling author of “Extraterrestrial: The first sign of intelligent life beyond Earth» and co-author of the manual «life in the cosmos”, both published in 2021.

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Psychology Training Programs | VA Augusta Health Care https://metroresearch.org/psychology-training-programs-va-augusta-health-care/ Wed, 14 Sep 2022 17:33:52 +0000 https://metroresearch.org/psychology-training-programs-va-augusta-health-care/ The CNVAMC is committed to recruiting and training various postdoctoral fellows. In accordance with the APA Accreditation Commission, we define cultural and individual differences and diversity as including, but not limited to, age, disability, ethnicity, gender, identity gender, language, national origin, race, religion, culture, sexual orientation and socioeconomic status. Applications from qualified minority individuals are […]]]>

The CNVAMC is committed to recruiting and training various postdoctoral fellows. In accordance with the APA Accreditation Commission, we define cultural and individual differences and diversity as including, but not limited to, age, disability, ethnicity, gender, identity gender, language, national origin, race, religion, culture, sexual orientation and socioeconomic status. Applications from qualified minority individuals are encouraged. Individuals who wish to be considered partly on the basis of a diversity variable should indicate their interest in their application cover letter.

Interested applicants should submit their documents online through APPIC’s centralized application service (APPA-CAS). To apply, applicants must submit the following:

1. A cover letter that outlines your postgraduate training goals and your perceived fit with our program. In your letter, please describe your previous educational and clinical experience relevant to the training offered in our program, your assessment of your training needs, and your overall career goals. Please read our full brochure carefully before applying. Please specify whether you are applying for the Interprofessional Stream or the Military Sexual Trauma Stream (or both).

2. A copy of your Curriculum Vita.

3. A letter from the president of your thesis committee describing the progress of your thesis and the expected date of defense if it is not yet finished, or confirming its success.

4. Three letters of recommendation from supervisors who have direct knowledge of your clinical work. At least one letter must be from an internship supervisor. If your supervisor provides one of your letters, they may indicate the status of your thesis in that letter. A separate fourth letter on this subject is not required in these circumstances.

5. An official transcript of your graduate work

Deadlines: Applications must be received online by December 16, 2022 receive consideration. The Director of Postgraduate Education and selected members of the Education Committee will review all submitted applications in detail and select selected candidates for interviews. All applicants will be notified of their interview status by email to the address provided in the APPA-CAS system. It is the candidate’s responsibility to ensure that correct and up-to-date contact information is provided in the online application. We plan to hold virtual interviews in late January/early February.

The VA Office of Academic Affiliations requires that all VA postgraduate education programs adhere to the APPIC postgraduate selection guidelines. Accordingly, we will adhere to the new postgraduate selection standards and common holding date. Offers may be made at any time after interviews have ended and may be held until Common holding date of Monday 02/27/2023. See the APPIC site for more information on CHD policies. Candidates will be notified when they are no longer considered and when all positions have been filled. The planned start date for 2022-2023 is August 14, 2023.

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Off With the Talking Heads: A plea for a COVID voice https://metroresearch.org/off-with-the-talking-heads-a-plea-for-a-covid-voice/ Sat, 10 Sep 2022 16:03:36 +0000 https://metroresearch.org/off-with-the-talking-heads-a-plea-for-a-covid-voice/ “We don’t have a single consolidated voice.” These are the words of Michael Osterholm, PhD, MPH, director of the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy at the University of Minnesota, on Meet the NBC Press approximately 6 months after the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. As everyone focused on the science of treatments and […]]]>

“We don’t have a single consolidated voice.”

These are the words of Michael Osterholm, PhD, MPH, director of the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy at the University of Minnesota, on Meet the NBC Press approximately 6 months after the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. As everyone focused on the science of treatments and vaccines, there was a lonely voice trying to say, you also have to think about communication.

The problem was never addressed. The result was the “sloppy” work of COVID-19 communication (as several sources have describe it) followed by a loss of public confidence in the government.

This lack of a singular voice can get even worse. As soon as the Biden administration took control of pandemic communications, it began televised press briefings, not with a single spokesperson (as Andrew Cuomo effectively did for New York at the start of the crisis), but having three spokespersons on screen. And now they seem to have added a fourth for 2022.

As pictured above, a recent White House press briefing on The PBS News Hour not one, not two, not three, but four public health officials share the latest information on vaccines targeting Omicron and the likely shift to annual COVID-19 boosters.

The CDC even admitted to its communication failures as recently as last month when the agency’s director, Rochelle Walensky, MD, MPH, acknowledged that their public guidance during the pandemic had been, “confusing and overwhelming. From the start, the focus was on science without focusing too much on the social aspect of the challenge.

This can be seen in a single number: 1 in 31.

This refers to the two teams of experts the Biden administration has assembled to manage the pandemic: the advisory council and the White House task force. Together they had 31 members. Among them were 15 doctors of medicine, 6 masters in public health, 5 doctors, but only one specialist in communications.

This ratio says a lot about the overall errors made in communications. It aligns directly with comments from Andy Slavitt, former senior COVID-19 adviser to the Biden administration, who said it would give the White House an “A” on the science side of their COVID-19 response, but an “F” on the “social science” side of their efforts.

Despite this persistent failure, the problem can and should be fixed.

Broad communication begins with a simple and central guiding principle, which is universally understood and respected in business and entertainment: the need for a single voice.

In the business world, you can see it embodied in the title of the 2012 bestselling book, “The only thing“, about the value of focusing on the most important task of a given project. Could the point be clearer than the title?

In the world of entertainment, screenwriting guru Robert McKee describes in his seminal 1997 book, “Story“, the age-old principles of what he calls “classical design” for telling a story. It dates back at least 4,000 years to Gilgamesh, the first written record of human communication. McKee’s first section on this is titled “Single vs. Multiple Protagonists”. He explains that having more than one main character “sweets the narrative”.

A concise and compelling presentation of this principle can be found in the 2009 article, “Nicholas Kristof’s advice to save the worldIn a brilliantly written essay, the two-time Pulitzer Prize winner describes the research of social psychologist Paul Slovic, PhD. Experiments show that donors will give eagerly to fundraising efforts to fight famine if one tells the story of a child at risk, but if the story being told is about two children, the level of interest begins to drop, and by the time the number hits the thousands, the connection is gone.

Communication is at its maximum with the singular. You can see it everywhere. There have never been American co-presidents, companies have only one CEO, and almost all major movies are made by a single director. This is how communication works.

Moreover, if it is essential in society that several voices be represented, when the time comes to communicate, it must come from a single voice.

All of this begs the question of why the biomedical community thinks they can communicate through a different set of principles. This is not the case.

The communication work was indeed botched. So how can we fix things in the future?

First, we need greater involvement of non-scientific voices. Medical doctors and doctors cannot do the job alone. Business and entertainment/media professionals understand communication broadly on a day-to-day basis. Their expertise must play an equal role in the coming efforts to deal with the current pandemic and future crises.

Second, government at all levels must accept the basic principle of one voice. This is how the brain has been programmed for thousands of years. Breaking this ground rule is fun for performers looking to provoke, delight, and amuse. But for the serious work of informing the masses about public health issues, there is no room for error.

Audiences demand clarity, and clarity demands a unique voice.

Randy Olson, Ph.D., is the director of the ABT Framework Narrative Training program, author of “Houston, we have a narrativeand the 2020 recipient of the John P. McGovern Award for Excellence in Biomedical Communication from the Southwestern Chapter of the American Medical Writers Association.

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Misclassification Bias in Estimating Clinical Severity of SARS-CoV-2 Variants – Authors’ Response https://metroresearch.org/misclassification-bias-in-estimating-clinical-severity-of-sars-cov-2-variants-authors-response/ Fri, 09 Sep 2022 01:38:14 +0000 https://metroresearch.org/misclassification-bias-in-estimating-clinical-severity-of-sars-cov-2-variants-authors-response/ We thank Christina Yek and her colleagues for their correspondence regarding our article. 1 Nyberg T Ferguson NM Nash SG et al. Comparative analysis of the risks of hospitalization and death associated with the omicron (B.1.1.529) and delta (B.1.617.2) variants of SARS-CoV-2 in England: a cohort study. They note that people who test positive for […]]]>
We thank Christina Yek and her colleagues for their correspondence regarding our article.

1

  • Nyberg T
  • Ferguson NM
  • Nash SG
  • et al.
Comparative analysis of the risks of hospitalization and death associated with the omicron (B.1.1.529) and delta (B.1.617.2) variants of SARS-CoV-2 in England: a cohort study.