Research plan – Metro Research http://metroresearch.org/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 06:40:40 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://metroresearch.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/cropped-icon-32x32.png Research plan – Metro Research http://metroresearch.org/ 32 32 Scientists Reveal New Lines of Attack to Increase Cancer Survival Rate | Research against cancer https://metroresearch.org/scientists-reveal-new-lines-of-attack-to-increase-cancer-survival-rate-research-against-cancer/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 06:00:00 +0000 https://metroresearch.org/scientists-reveal-new-lines-of-attack-to-increase-cancer-survival-rate-research-against-cancer/ Scientists hope to double the survival rate of people with advanced cancer within a decade by using new lines of attack to fight the disease. Speaking at the launch of a five-year joint research strategy by the Institute of Cancer Research (ICR) and the Royal Marsden NHS Foundation in London, experts described how targeting non-cancerous […]]]>

Scientists hope to double the survival rate of people with advanced cancer within a decade by using new lines of attack to fight the disease.

Speaking at the launch of a five-year joint research strategy by the Institute of Cancer Research (ICR) and the Royal Marsden NHS Foundation in London, experts described how targeting non-cancerous cells in tumors could open new frontiers in the fight against disease, allowing more people to be cured and others to survive much longer.

Although cancer is initially caused by mutations that cause cells to grow and divide abnormally, the environment of a tumor affects how it grows and spreads. “We increasingly see disease as a complex ecosystem, in which cancer cells evolve amidst a web of cells and signals from surrounding tissues and the immune system,” said the ICR’s chief executive. , Professor Kristian Helin. “We have identified the evolution of cancer in [this] ecosystem as a major challenge and an opportunity for the next five years.

One strategy they plan to deploy is to break the ability of cancer cells to ask other cells to come and support them. For example, cancer cells sometimes send signals to the bone marrow, instructing “slave cells” to create “nests” in other parts of the body where cancer cells could migrate and create secondary tumors. Interrupting these systems would help stop the spread of cancer.

Experts are also learning how they could use drugs that talk to the immune system, increasing its ability to recognize and destroy cancer cells and dampening the activities of immune cells that are co-opted to help protect cancer cells.

“We aim to tip the scales in favor of the immune system and make the environment inhospitable to cancer cells and favorable to elements of the immune system that can attack them, so that we can eradicate the disease in the body,” said said Kevin. Harrington, Professor of Biological Cancer Therapeutics at ICR and Consultant at Royal Marsden.

Another lead is to use genetically engineered viruses to “target cancer cells and also talk to the microenvironment, the ecosystem that cancer is in, to generate a signal to reject cancer and kill those cancer cells,” he said. said Professor Harrington.

Scientists will also expand research supporting the development of ‘liquid biopsies’ to identify the disease in its early stages. Tumors often release microscopic fragments of genetic material into the bloodstream, which could be detected and used to inform treatment. Already, such blood tests are being used to personalize cancer treatment and identify recurrences earlier.

Dr Naureen Starling, Consultant Medical Oncologist at Royal Marsden, said: “We believe this technology also has the potential to transform cancer diagnosis, particularly for traditionally hard-to-detect tumor types such as the pancreas. [cancer]which could lead to rapid improvements in patient outcomes.

The researchers also plan to use artificial intelligence to devise new ways to combine drugs or adjust their dosage – with the aim of blocking the progression of cancer within its ecosystem and increasing survival time. people with advanced cancer.

Dr Olivia Rossanese, Director of Cancer Drug Discovery at ICR, said: “We plan to open up entirely new lines of attack against cancer, so that we can overcome cancer’s deadly ability to grow and become resistant to treatment.

“We want to discover better targets within tumors and the broader ecosystem that we can attack with drugs. We’re finding powerful new ways to completely eradicate cancerous proteins and discovering smarter combination treatments that attack cancer on multiple fronts.

“Together, this three-pronged approach can create smarter, gentler cancer treatments and give patients a longer life with fewer side effects.”

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Michigan Council on Future Mobility and Electrification recommends policy changes and investments to better position the state as a transportation leader https://metroresearch.org/michigan-council-on-future-mobility-and-electrification-recommends-policy-changes-and-investments-to-better-position-the-state-as-a-transportation-leader/ Wed, 16 Nov 2022 22:17:53 +0000 https://metroresearch.org/michigan-council-on-future-mobility-and-electrification-recommends-policy-changes-and-investments-to-better-position-the-state-as-a-transportation-leader/ Michigan has announced more than 30,000 auto jobs since January 2019, strong growth driven by bipartisan economic development, workforce programs, focus on electrification and chips LANSING, Mich.—Today, the Michigan Council on Future Mobility and Electrification released 16 policy recommendations to continue the state’s efforts to remain a global leader in mobility and electric vehicles. The […]]]>

Michigan has announced more than 30,000 auto jobs since January 2019, strong growth driven by bipartisan economic development, workforce programs, focus on electrification and chips

LANSING, Mich.—Today, the Michigan Council on Future Mobility and Electrification released 16 policy recommendations to continue the state’s efforts to remain a global leader in mobility and electric vehicles. The recommendations were presented in the board’s 2022 annual report and are designed to help achieve the ambitious goals set out in Governor Whitmer’s MI Future Mobility Plan, Michigan’s new strategy to maintain global leadership in next-generation transportation until ‘in 2030.

“The future of mobility in Michigan is bright as we focus on responsive policy that meets the needs of our workers, our businesses and our communities,” said Trevor Ratchet, state mobility director and director of the Michigan Office of Future Mobility and Electrification. “A state that focuses on new policy frameworks that take into account future mobility scenarios will have the agility to take on leadership positions as the transportation landscape rapidly evolves. By acting on these recommendations, we can achieve the goals of Governor Whitmer’s MI Future Mobility Plan and keep Michigan in the driving seat for decades to come.

The Michigan Council on Future Mobility and Electrification was created by Governor Whitmer in 2020, bringing together leaders from the automotive industry, research universities, clean fuel advocates and state government to provide annual recommendations to state policy and ensuring that Michigan continues to be an epicenter. transport solutions of the future around mobility and electrification.

Members include Ford Motor Company, General Motors, Stellantis, Toyota, Rivian, Waymo, University of Michigan, Michigan State University, United Auto Workers, majority and minority House and Senate legislators, Clean Fuels Michigan and eight state departments and agencies.

Over the past year, the council has engaged with stakeholders across the state in a series of task forces to identify ways to overcome mobility issues. These working groups were supported by subject matter experts from the Center for Automotive Research, Peracchio and Co., and the American Center for Mobility. Based on the findings of the working group and guided by the three pillars outlined in MI’s future mobility plan, the following recommendations were made:

Transition and growth of our mobility industry and workforce.

  • Invest in bus rapid transit and spend $10 million to revive the state’s mobility challenges to address barriers to jobs and equity.
  • Fund a public relations campaign to strengthen MI’s leadership in sustainability.
  • Scale the Michigan EV Jobs Academy.
  • Create a global center of excellence for responsible artificial intelligence.

Provide safer, greener and more accessible transport infrastructure

  • Expand Michigan’s alternative fuel corridor opportunities for clean hydrogen and commission a study of hydrogen applications in commercial traffic.
  • Develop accessibility standards for EV chargers.
  • Create a public incentive for consumers of electric vehicles.
  • Fund a $45 million bus electrification program.
  • Expand the use of sinking funds to support the deployment of electric school buses.
  • Support phase two of the MDOT Work Area Safety Pilot Program.
  • Design a clean fuels standard that works for Michigan.

Global leader in mobility and electrification policy and innovation

  • Invest $30 million in the development of UAS technology.
  • Pass legislation to preserve Michigan’s uniform automated vehicle policy statewide.
  • Maintain annual capacity support for state mobility agencies.
  • Pass a law to create a tax credit for research and development of mobile talents.
  • Continue to advocate with federal decision makers on important issues related to connected vehicles.

“To remain the world leader in mobility, Michigan must continue to reinvent public policy, invest in high-quality communities and infrastructure, and continue to deploy and test mobility innovations,” said Susan Corbin, director of the Michigan Department of Labor and Economic Opportunity and president of the Michigan Council on Future Mobility and Electrification. “We must also win more business attraction opportunities than our competitors and develop exceptional talent that will lead our state into the next generation of mobility.”

Since CFME’s 2021 Annual Report, major strides have been made to keep Michigan’s global mobility leadership intact. The main investments from 2022 include:

  • General Motors is making a historic $7 billion investment in two Michigan plants to expand assembly operations and battery cell production.
  • LG Energy Solution announces $1.7 billion investment to create 1,200 new jobs and accelerate battery production in Holland, Michigan.

These investments in the production of electric vehicles and advanced mobility are only the tip of the iceberg; more opportunities to invest in a skilled workforce, development and attraction of high-tech talent, infrastructure readiness and an attractive economic development environment are on the horizon.

“For 50 years, Michigan has been home to Toyota’s North American research and development operations, which are now our largest in the world outside of Japan,” said Derek Caveney, Senior Engineer – Integrated Vehicle Systems Division at Toyota North America. “This legacy of growth and success can be attributed to all the state has to offer. Through our participation in the Michigan Council on Future Mobility and Electrification, we are pleased to offer our perspective to help Michigan maintain a leadership position in mobility for the next generation.

“The policies detailed in this year’s Council report demonstrate the wide range of solutions available to unlock a cleaner and fairer transport system,” said Jane McCurry, Executive Director at Clean Fuels. “Effective and coordinated policies are needed to continue to grow clean fuel industries in Michigan. Capitalizing on the diverse opportunities available to us today – from federal funding to state policy initiatives – will create well-paying jobs and keep Michigan at the forefront of innovative mobility.”

“Rivian is proud to be part of the Michigan Council on Future Mobility and Electrification and supports the Council’s mission to develop the state’s comprehensive electrification strategy and coordinate specific goals, policies, and programs to serve all parties. stakeholders,” said Chris Nevers, Senior Director of Public Policy at Rivian. “The Council is leading by example on what states can do to accelerate the transition to electrification while thinking about accessibility, innovation and workforce development.”

The council looks forward to working with state legislators to implement these recommendations over the next year to help Michigan maintain its strong global leadership in mobility and electrification.

To learn more about the Michigan Council on Future Mobility and Electrification and the MI Future Mobility Plan, visit www.michiganbusiness.org/ofme.

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The University of Oregon plans to develop a new rechargeable battery https://metroresearch.org/the-university-of-oregon-plans-to-develop-a-new-rechargeable-battery/ Sun, 13 Nov 2022 21:41:40 +0000 https://metroresearch.org/the-university-of-oregon-plans-to-develop-a-new-rechargeable-battery/ PORTLAND — A research team led by Oregon State University plans to develop a new rechargeable battery that could reduce the need for environmentally destructive mining of rare minerals like nickel and lithium and accelerate the transition to an energy own. The U.S. Department of Energy awarded OSU $3 million to explore the development of […]]]>

PORTLAND — A research team led by Oregon State University plans to develop a new rechargeable battery that could reduce the need for environmentally destructive mining of rare minerals like nickel and lithium and accelerate the transition to an energy own.

The U.S. Department of Energy awarded OSU $3 million to explore the development of new rechargeable battery technology that would accelerate the transition to clean energy without relying on rare finite minerals such as lithium, cobalt and nickel. OSU chemistry professor Xiulei “David” Ji, who will lead a battery research team, said it could be a game-changer.

“It’s a new paradigm,” he told Oregon Public Broadcasting. “We are very excited and very grateful to have this opportunity to work on this project.”

As the world shifts from fossil fuels to clean energy to reduce contributions to climate change, there is a growing need for batteries to store renewable energy and power electric vehicles. The resulting battery boom has raised environmental concerns due to the impacts of mining battery materials such as lithium, and it has driven up prices and demand for the minerals used to make batteries.

According to the International Energy Agency, an organization that provides data analysis for global energy policies, the world could face lithium shortages by 2025. The price of lithium has soared, tripling in 2021. Nickel, a mineral used for lithium-ion batteries, has also increased in demand and seen price increases.

Ji, who will lead a team of researchers from Howard University, the University of Maryland and Vanderbilt University, said relying on these minerals is unsustainable and expensive. He said meeting clean energy goals soon will require moving away from relatively rare finite minerals.

His plan is to explore anionic batteries that provide the necessary components without using limited minerals like those used by lithium batteries and which could potentially increase the amount of energy a battery can hold.

“New battery chemistry doesn’t have to rely on these elements,” Ji said. “That’s the advantage of the new chemistry. This changes things.

Ji said the primary market for these batteries would be electric vehicles, but he doesn’t rule out the possibility of anion batteries being used by large-scale utilities, such as Portland General Electric’s solar, wind and battery facilities. . He also said they could be commercialized soon and used in homes.

It’s something Meredith Connolly, executive director of the nonprofit Climate Solutions, is looking forward to.

She said that powering the economy with 100% clean electricity from wind and solar power is a key part of reducing fossil fuels, and batteries are an essential part of achieving a transition to a clean energy.

“Part of the technological magic that batteries provide is the ability to store wind power when the wind is blowing and solar power when the sun is shining, then deploy that renewable energy when there is no wind. or the sun goes down,” she said.

As electric vehicle production increases, Connolly said, batteries need to be sourced and recycled sustainably to reuse raw materials.

Oregon and Washington are among the states offering generous incentives and rebates for switching from gasoline-powered vehicles to electric vehicles.

Recently, Oregon began offering qualified residents up to $7,500 for a new electric vehicle. So far, more than 50,000 electric vehicles are registered in the state. Oregon is also investing $100 million to build charging infrastructure on major highways and in rural areas to meet demand for electric vehicles on the road.

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Former boxer and fitness trainer, U of T grad finds his calling in academic research https://metroresearch.org/former-boxer-and-fitness-trainer-u-of-t-grad-finds-his-calling-in-academic-research/ Thu, 10 Nov 2022 22:16:44 +0000 https://metroresearch.org/former-boxer-and-fitness-trainer-u-of-t-grad-finds-his-calling-in-academic-research/ Kyle Farwell devoted most of his 20 years to amateur boxing, hoping to one day qualify for the Olympics. “It consumed my life,” he says. “It was about getting into the boxing gym before work, after work, on weekends.” He qualified for the Commonwealth Games, but ultimately decided not to pursue his boxing career. Instead, […]]]>

Kyle Farwell devoted most of his 20 years to amateur boxing, hoping to one day qualify for the Olympics.

“It consumed my life,” he says. “It was about getting into the boxing gym before work, after work, on weekends.”

He qualified for the Commonwealth Games, but ultimately decided not to pursue his boxing career. Instead, he turned to personal training, which occupied the next 13 years of his life – and eventually led him to study kinesiology at the University of Toronto.

“I was still working as a full-time certified personal trainer when I started my undergraduate studies,” says Farwell, who graduated this week from the Faculty of Kinesiology and Physical Education (KPE).

He says he wants to learn more about the knowledge and research behind his industry.

“I worked very hard to be good at my job and felt rewarded when my contribution was required to assess clients and train new employees, but I always asked myself, ‘Why are we doing the right things? this way ?’ For example, if someone’s knee comes off, how do we know it’s that muscle that’s failing, that we need to strengthen?The fitness industry can sometimes speak in absolute terms.

Besides having an inquisitive mind, Farwell had personal reasons for returning to school. After having back surgery several years ago, he decided working out at a gym wasn’t helping his recovery. He also had a young family to think about: a wife and a son.

“Coincidentally, the Ontario government was starting to supplement OSAP (Ontario Student Assistance Program) with more scholarships for mature students,” says Farwell. “I didn’t want to ask myself later in life – or have my son ask me – ‘What were you doing when they offered free education?’ I wanted to have a good answer to that.

So he applied to kinesiology at U of T and never looked back — even applying to do research in the summer months.

“I had such a great time in my freshman year that I didn’t want to just take two months off or work in the summer,” he says. “I knew I would miss being on campus, so I jumped at the chance to apply for the undergraduate research.”

He worked with Associate Professor Katherine Tamminen from KPE’s Sport and Performance Psychology Lab to explore athletes’ emotional responses to injury. Not only was Farwell able to identify personally with the research, but he says he was quickly “hooked” and credits Tamminen for helping launch his career as an academic researcher. “I love running into Professor Tamminen and saying that to her when I see her,” he says.

Another highlight: a cadaver anatomy dissection project with an assistant professor David Frost which was co-supervised by Associate Professor Judi Laprade from the Temerty Faculty of Medicine at the University of Toronto, Assistant Professor KPE Timothy Burkhart and Tyson Beachnow a lecturer in biomechanics at the University of Waterloo.

“It was an amazing experience,” says Farwell. “I was literally working with thorns every day. There was so much to take in.

(Image via University of Toronto)

Beyond his classes and his research, Farwell has fond memories of the three years he spent living in student family housing on Charles Street.

“It was such a cool time in our lives,” he says. “My son Logan had daycare across the street from one of my classes, so I would take him to daycare and then walk across the hall to my class and everyone could meet him, talk to him and give him tips. high fives.”

The only challenge during his studies was time, “but there’s nothing unique about that,” he says. “It was difficult to balance everything, but the [KPE] offers huge resources – you just have to use them.

His advice to students coming up behind him? “Do ordinary things very well. There’s nothing unique about me, but what I did well was that I showed up for every class. I don’t think I missed an undergrad class. I sat in the front row. I asked questions when I had them. I didn’t care what people thought of me, even though everyone was awesome. I did the readings. Anyone can do that.

“It’s a good program and everyone has worked hard to get here, so don’t let up on the gas now that you’re here.”

Farwell certainly did not. He is already working on a master’s degree in kinesiology with Frost as his supervisor.

“I love it,” he says. “Thanks to the research I did during my undergraduate studies, I already have data to support some of the things I plan to study for my master’s thesis – in particular, how certain stresses affect different characteristics movement in an individual.

“I love the research process, but my real interest is in applying this knowledge to the general population in a meaningful way.”

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Democrats shouldn’t be shocked by a miserable midterm https://metroresearch.org/democrats-shouldnt-be-shocked-by-a-miserable-midterm/ Tue, 08 Nov 2022 14:12:50 +0000 https://metroresearch.org/democrats-shouldnt-be-shocked-by-a-miserable-midterm/ Comment this story Comment By all indications, today will be a bad day for Democrats. Polls suggest they’re set to lose the House, possibly the Senate, and likely a slew of competitive races they should have won. Such defeats are not unusual for a president’s party in midterm elections. But this one should induce some […]]]>

Comment

By all indications, today will be a bad day for Democrats. Polls suggest they’re set to lose the House, possibly the Senate, and likely a slew of competitive races they should have won. Such defeats are not unusual for a president’s party in midterm elections. But this one should induce some introspection.

Democrats may wonder where they went wrong. With unified control of government, they spent nearly $2 trillion for Covid aid, $1.2 trillion for infrastructure, $280 billion for research and chip manufacturing, $667 billion for a new veterans benefit and over $350 billion for green energy, among others. . There was gun control reform, an overhaul of the postal service, and a huge relief effort for Ukraine. In a grand finale, President Joe Biden unilaterally wrote off some $400 billion in student loan debt.

What more ?

A little restraint, to begin with. In poll after poll, voters cited soaring prices as their top concern. Yet Democrats have spent two years demanding more and bigger spending packages. Although many analysts have warned that the $1.9 trillion U.S. bailout was too big and poorly targeted, Democrats have refused to seriously negotiate with Republicans on a slimmed-down version. By one estimate, this plan and similar stimulus measures added about 3 percentage points to inflation. Yet the madness continued.

A similar dynamic has set in with public security. In major cities this year, the homicide rate is up nearly 40% from 2019. Nearly three-quarters of Americans say they are dissatisfied with policies aimed at reducing crime. Democrats, however, offered virtually no response on the matter. A last-minute effort to distance itself from ‘defunding the police’ – a nonsensical slogan that in some places has had devastating real-life consequences – and backing more cops on the spot did not convince many. voters.

A pollster found bragging about one’s own accomplishments was the “worst performing message” for Democrats. And it’s no wonder: On two of voters’ biggest concerns, they were completely out of touch.

Republicans, for their part, have spent the past few months fanning the flames of the culture war and ignoring public policy altogether. This strategy had a certain logic in a heated campaign. But the party now has a responsibility to advance a real agenda. More specifically: both parties have a duty to negotiate in good faith on areas of mutual interest.

Start with inflation. Although price stabilization is primarily the responsibility of the Federal Reserve, prudent policy could certainly make it easier for it to do so. Notably, both parties should agree that the tariffs erected under Donald Trump’s administration are inflationary, inefficient and completely self-defeating. An analysis found that a simple two percentage point reduction in tariffs could lower inflation by 1.3 percentage points. It should be obvious.

Other measures to reduce prices are more controversial. Democrats are unlikely to drop union-friendly procurement provisions, for example, even if it would reduce the cost of government projects. But the two sides could agree to repeal the Jones Act, an indiscriminate protectionist measure that scolds shipping, raises consumer prices, inflates energy costs, erodes competitiveness and hampers the clean energy agenda of the President.

Likewise, despite fighting for months over the crime, the parties aren’t that far apart on what they’d like to do about it. In September, the House passed a bipartisan package to fund more local police, following a similar White House proposal. Research shows that adding more police officers results in lower crime and that federal funding of local law enforcement can have pronounced benefits. Coupled with some common-sense reforms to ensure police accountability and improve gun safety, an anti-crime deal shouldn’t be implausible.

While a pragmatic spirit prevails, there is also common ground in many other areas: on Biden’s plans for a “moonshot” cancer, on immigration reform, on energy independence and more. Former and possibly future Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said he was open to such a compromise.

Realistically, an outbreak of bipartisan serenity is unlikely. But when the next Congress convenes, both sides will face a choice: spend the next two years on stunts and symbolism, or work together to solve real problems. The right decision should be obvious.

More other writers at Bloomberg Opinion

• Only Republicans Can Save American Democracy: Jonathan Bernstein

• Party etiquette matters most to voters: David A. Hopkins

• Democrats have alienated voters they need most: Clive Crook

The editors are members of the Bloomberg Opinion Editorial Board.

More stories like this are available at bloomberg.com/opinion

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Researchers work to protect coral as signs of deadly disease appear off Texas Gulf Coast https://metroresearch.org/researchers-work-to-protect-coral-as-signs-of-deadly-disease-appear-off-texas-gulf-coast/ Sat, 05 Nov 2022 11:00:00 +0000 https://metroresearch.org/researchers-work-to-protect-coral-as-signs-of-deadly-disease-appear-off-texas-gulf-coast/ At the Moody Gardens Aquarium in Galveston, about 100 different corals sit in tanks of water in an enclosed room. Some are brown with markings that make them look like brains. Others have bright green coloring between their grooves. All were rescued from Florida after a deadly coral disease, known as stony coral tissue loss […]]]>

At the Moody Gardens Aquarium in Galveston, about 100 different corals sit in tanks of water in an enclosed room. Some are brown with markings that make them look like brains. Others have bright green coloring between their grooves. All were rescued from Florida after a deadly coral disease, known as stony coral tissue loss disease, began infecting the reefs there.

“There isn’t exactly a book on how to care for a coral, and many of these species have never been cared for in captivity before this program,” said Brooke Carlson, senior biologist at Moody Gardens.

Moody Gardens is one of approximately 20 zoos and aquariums across the country that collected rescue corals from Florida in 2019, with the goal of breeding them in captivity and eventually breeding them to restore damaged reefs.

“The plan was to remove as many healthy corals as possible from the population and put them in captivity so they would be safe from disease,” Carlson said.

First detected in Florida in 2014, stony coral tissue loss disease is characterized by its rapid spread and high mortality rate. Once infected, corals usually die within weeks to months. Wildlife officials are racing to protect corals and prevent the disease from spreading further.

Since its discovery in Florida, stony coral tissue loss disease has spread to more than 20 countries and territories in the Caribbean. Now divers have noticed potential signs of the disease at the Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary, a protected area about 100 miles offshore from Galveston.

A map of the Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary



“They were seeing lesions on some corals. It’s like a white line where tissue has been lost,” said Michelle Johnston, an ecologist researcher at Flower Garden Banks.

Johnston said they prepared a response plan after seeing what happened in Florida.

“Within three days of those sightings, we were responding,” she said. “We wasted no time.”

The response plan included taking samples of healthy and diseased corals for analysis and applying antibiotic treatment – ​​a mixture of amoxicillin and mastic – to the lesions of some of the infected corals.

Biologist Julianna Trapp stands next to a hard coral tank that was rescued from Florida when a deadly disease began spreading there.

Katie Watkins/Houston Public Media/

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Biologist Julianna Trapp stands next to a hard coral tank that was rescued from Florida when a deadly disease began spreading there.

Johnston said the disease doesn’t appear to be progressing as quickly as in Florida, which could be because the coral at Flower Gardens is healthier and more resilient. Or it could mean it’s a different, less deadly disease.

“Right now, only time will tell,” Johnston said.

The problem is that researchers still don’t know exactly what’s causing the loss of stony coral tissue — they don’t know if it’s bacteria, a virus, or a combination of the two.

“For coral disease research, we’re still kind of in the dark ages,” said Andy Bruckner, research coordinator at the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary. “We’re kind of like where we were with human medicine in the late 1800s. We’re just learning.”

saving corals at the Moody Gardens Aquarium in Galveston

Katie Watkins/Houston Public Media/

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saving corals at the Moody Gardens Aquarium in Galveston

Bruckner said that globally, corals are already under a lot of stress due to factors such as warming and acidification of the oceans due to climate change and poor water quality due to pollution. . This stress makes them more susceptible to disease.

“One of the reasons why this disease has become so severe is that the corals are then somehow compromised by environmental stressors,” he said.

Bruckner is one of the authors of a five-year action plan recently launched by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to respond to stony coral tissue loss disease.

During a call announcing the plan, federal researchers said they see the disease as a potential global threat and want to prevent it from spreading to Indo-Pacific reefs. They hope to focus on what causes it, how it spreads and how to diagnose it.

Senior Biologist Brooke Carlson handles coral rescue at the Moody Gardens Aquarium.  The goal is to keep the coral safe until it can be replanted in the wild.

Katie Watkins/Houston Public Media/

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Senior Biologist Brooke Carlson handles coral rescue at the Moody Gardens Aquarium. The goal is to keep the coral safe until it can be replanted in the wild.



Bruckner said ideally they want to create a simple test, like the one doctors use for strep throat, to quickly diagnose outbreaks.

“We’re looking to develop these same kinds of tools for corals, so that we can go in and when we see an outbreak of disease, we can immediately say ‘Yes, it’s stony coral tissue disease’ or ‘ No, it is not,” he said.

Bruckner said being able to diagnose the disease will help them implement more effective treatment plans.

Continuing to protect and breed healthy corals in captivity is also part of the new action plan. Healthy coral from the Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary has already been sent to Moody Gardens, where it is in the care of Brooke Carlson.

A biologist uses a turkey baster to feed coral at the Moody Gardens lab in Galveston.

Katie Watkins/Houston Public Media/

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A biologist uses a turkey baster to feed coral at the Moody Gardens lab in Galveston.

“They’ve been doing really well in this month that we’ve had them,” Carlson said.

Flower Garden Banks corals are completely separate from Florida corals, as they come from different ecosystems, but Carlson said a lot of what they learned from caring for Florida coral can be applied, such as their food preferences. .

On a recent Wednesday, Carlson and his team started making Florida Coral Lunch at the lab, combining ingredients like zooplankton and oyster tissue in a pitcher.

Biologists use a turkey baster to place the liquid meal on each individual coral.

Divers apply antibiotic paste to diseased coral at the Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary.

Divers apply antibiotic paste to diseased coral at the Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary.



“Beyond just growing their skeletons, they grow thicker tissue — so what I like to call softer corals,” Carlson said.

Soon they will be ready to be sent to another facility for breeding.

While the coral may not have the initial charisma of other sea animals, Carlson said that after spending so much time with them, she came to learn all of the subtle differences between each individual coral.

“Anyone can identify with a mammal, but it’s harder to associate the same emotion with a coral, when it looks like a slimy rock,” she said. “But to be able to see them react to food, to see them thrive in that environment has been extremely rewarding.”

9020_PSTR_1_NCRMP



Carlson said protecting corals is essential because they serve as the foundation of the ecosystem, providing habitat and food for so many species.

“Without the corals, the ecosystem could collapse,” she said. “It’s very important that these corals are doing well and hopefully returning to the wild. That way we can help rebuild this really crucial ecosystem.”

Copyright 2022 Houston Public Media News 88.7. For more, visit Houston Public Media News 88.7.

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Court allows environmentalists’ request to intervene in Exxon Trucking case https://metroresearch.org/court-allows-environmentalists-request-to-intervene-in-exxon-trucking-case/ Thu, 03 Nov 2022 00:09:14 +0000 https://metroresearch.org/court-allows-environmentalists-request-to-intervene-in-exxon-trucking-case/ SANTA BARBARA, California– A federal judge ruled today that conservation and Indigenous groups can help legally defend Santa Barbara County’s denial of ExxonMobil’s proposal to ship large amounts of oil along dangerous California highways. ExxonMobil is suing the county for rejecting the plan, which would have helped the company restart three Santa Barbara Canal oil […]]]>

SANTA BARBARA, California– A federal judge ruled today that conservation and Indigenous groups can help legally defend Santa Barbara County’s denial of ExxonMobil’s proposal to ship large amounts of oil along dangerous California highways.

ExxonMobil is suing the county for rejecting the plan, which would have helped the company restart three Santa Barbara Canal oil rigs that have been shut down since the 2015 Refugio oil spill.

The Environmental Defense Center, Get Oil Out!, Santa Barbara County Action Network, Sierra Club, Surfrider Foundation, Center for Biological Diversity, and Wishtoyo Foundation cited the trucking proposal’s risks to public safety and environmental and cultural resources in their attempt to join Santa Barbara County in defending the denial of the trucking proposal.

In March 2022, the board of supervisors rejected ExxonMobil’s proposal to transport more than 460,000 gallons of oil per day for up to seven years. In May 2022, ExxonMobil filed a lawsuit against the county’s denial in federal court in Los Angeles. Environmental groups have sought to join the lawsuit to help ensure the dangerous project does not go ahead, preventing further risks of oil spills, traffic accidents and air pollution. in our communities.

Today, the court granted the groups’ request and recognized their important interests in ensuring that ExxonMobil’s denial of the project is upheld.

“Trucking is one of the most dangerous ways to transport oil. Recent oil tanker accidents prove how dangerous ExxonMobil’s proposal to restart its offshore oil rigs and transport crude oil along scenic and perilous routes is. Our research revealed that there have been eight serious accidents involving tankers along ExxonMobil’s proposed route since 2007, resulting in fatalities, oil spills, injuries, fires and road closures. said Linda Krop, chief attorney for the Environmental Defense Center, which represents members of the organization, Get Oil Out!, Santa Barbara County Action Network, Sierra Club and Surfrider Foundation. “We are committed to ensuring that ExxonMobil’s project does not proceed – to protect the health and safety of our communities, our climate and our coastline.”

“I am outraged that Exxon has the nerve to sue Santa Barbara County for trying to protect people from oil trucks,” said Julie Teel Simmonds, senior attorney at the Center for Biological Diversity. “The oil that contaminated California beaches in 2015 came from this company’s offshore platforms, which operate in public waters. Our coast has already suffered so much from offshore drilling, and this filthy industry has no right to increase the risk by trucking huge amounts of oil on some of our most dangerous highways.

ExxonMobil’s plan would have added up to 24,800 oil-filled truck trips a year on coastal Highway 101 and dangerous Highway 166. ExxonMobil’s three hubs off Santa Barbara were shut down in 2015 after the Plains All American pipeline ruptured and spilled over 450,000 gallons of heavy crude oil onto our beaches and into the Santa Barbara Canal, spilling into Orange County. In 2020, Santa Barbara County planning staff recommended a tank truck ban on Route 166 after a major accident spilled over 4,500 gallons into the Cuyama River.

“Exxon’s risky proposal to truck 460,000 gallons of oil along our coastline and down a dangerous mountain highway is not just an imminent accident, but an accident that will be occur. This is exactly why Get Oil Out! continue to oppose reckless projects like this,” said Michael Lyons, President of Get Oil Out!. “As such, we are delighted that GOO! and its environmental partners are now stakeholders in this important matter,” he added.

“A 2020 oil tanker spill on Highway 166 threatened to pollute the Twitchell Reservoir, which is the cornerstone of the Santa Maria Valley agricultural economy and the source of drinking water for 200,000 residents,” said Ken Hough of the Santa Barbara County Action Network.

The county’s rejection earlier this year of ExxonMobil’s proposal was based on the project’s significant and unavoidable damage to biological, water and cultural resources in the event of a spill, as well as the project’s other threats to public health, safety and general well-being.

“Surfrider Foundation Santa Barbara Chapter has worked tirelessly for decades to protect the Gaviota Coast from inappropriate development and destruction at the hands of the oil industry. The history of oil industry damage to Santa Barbara dates back to the infamous 1969 oil spill, which some people consider a watershed moment in the development of the environmental movement,” said Ken Palley, executive committee member of Surfrider’s Santa Barbara Chapter. “We are thrilled with this decision because it is a step towards protecting our beautiful and irreplaceable coastline from further catastrophic oil spills.”

“ExxonMobil cannot be allowed to bully local governments and poison communities,” said Katie Davis, president of the Santa Barbara-Ventura chapter of the Sierra Club. “The county followed the law to determine the risks of this project – which would restart aging offshore oil rigs, pump carcinogenic air pollution from their onshore treatment plant and send explosive oil trucks down dangerous roads – prevailed. about all the possible benefits, even before considering the urgent need to get out of the fossil fuels that are causing the climate crisis.

See the video produced by @vacationland for @environmentaldefensecenter. Made by @offline.media.account and @nicholas_weissman.

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Britain faces £100m loss from drilling in biggest new oilfield, study finds | Oil https://metroresearch.org/britain-faces-100m-loss-from-drilling-in-biggest-new-oilfield-study-finds-oil/ Sun, 30 Oct 2022 10:00:00 +0000 https://metroresearch.org/britain-faces-100m-loss-from-drilling-in-biggest-new-oilfield-study-finds-oil/ The government stands to suffer a loss of more than £100million if drilling in the UK’s largest undeveloped oilfield is approved, according to new research examining a tax break introduced by Rishi Sunak. Sunak made a dramatic U-turn last May when he introduced the ‘energy profit tax’ as Chancellor – effectively a one-off tax on […]]]>

The government stands to suffer a loss of more than £100million if drilling in the UK’s largest undeveloped oilfield is approved, according to new research examining a tax break introduced by Rishi Sunak.

Sunak made a dramatic U-turn last May when he introduced the ‘energy profit tax’ as Chancellor – effectively a one-off tax on energy producers. However, he also introduced a very generous tax break for fossil fuel producers to ensure that “the more a company invests, the less tax it will pay”.

According to research seen by the Observer, this could contribute to a £114m loss to the government over the life of the Rosebank field in the North Sea. This will put pressure on Sunak, who has already downgraded the role of climate change minister and said he will not attend the Cop27 meeting in Egypt. He is under pressure to sanction a significantly expanded windfall tax as part of next month’s medium-term budget plan.

Permission to develop the Rosebank field, west of Shetland, has been requested by Equinor, the Norwegian state oil company. Equinor said it hopes to make a final investment decision by next year.

When all set-up and decommissioning grants and tax breaks are factored in, new analysis from WWF Norway suggests the UK government will suffer a loss of around £100m on Rosebank. “The UK government would have been better off with the previous tax regime – before the introduction of the windfall tax and its loophole – which could have guaranteed an additional tax revenue of £508 million,” Guro Lystad said. , Senior Advisor on Climate and Energy at WWF Norway.

Equinor currently only operates three oil and gas fields in the UK, two of which are cross-border projects with Norway. The UK public will effectively cover 91% of Rosebank’s development costs through grants and developer tax breaks, according to the research.

Tessa Khan, director of campaign group Uplift, said: “If this government approves of Rosebank, the British public will be poorer while the Norwegian public, who own most of Equinor, will be wealthier. It’s that simple. The Prime Minister must close this gaping loophole in the current windfall tax, which he introduced.

A spokesperson for Equinor said no final investment decision had been made, adding: “The idea that the British public will pay anything to Equinor and its Rosebank partners is simply wrong. . In Rosebank’s Socio-Economic Report, compiled by WoodMac this summer, it was estimated that Rosebank will create £8.1bn of direct investment, of which £6.3bn is likely to be invested in UK-based businesses. UK.

“If we don’t develop Rosebank, demand remains and the UK risks becoming more dependent on imports (which have a higher CO2 footprint) while losing jobs, industrial and supply chain development, as well as future tax revenue.”

A government spokesperson said: “There will be continued demand for oil and gas over the next few years as we transition to cleaner, low carbon energy – this ensures we protect energy security , British jobs and industries, without becoming more dependent on foreign imports. . The Energy Profits Levy, on top of a 40% headline tax rate for industry, is set to raise £17billion this year and next to help fund cost-of-living support for eight millions of people. We also want to see the sector reinvest its profits to support the economy and future energy security.

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California awards $96 million for climate projects in 10 frontline communities https://metroresearch.org/california-awards-96-million-for-climate-projects-in-10-frontline-communities/ Fri, 28 Oct 2022 01:13:41 +0000 https://metroresearch.org/california-awards-96-million-for-climate-projects-in-10-frontline-communities/ The state has allocated a total of $661 million to the Transformative Climate Communities program since 2016 to support community-led climate projects SACRAMENTO — The state today approved $96.2 million in grants to support 10 disadvantaged, unincorporated, and tribal communities across California to plan and implement neighborhood-level projects that reduce emissions greenhouse gases, improve public […]]]>

The state has allocated a total of $661 million to the Transformative Climate Communities program since 2016 to support community-led climate projects

SACRAMENTO — The state today approved $96.2 million in grants to support 10 disadvantaged, unincorporated, and tribal communities across California to plan and implement neighborhood-level projects that reduce emissions greenhouse gases, improve public health and the environment, and expand economic opportunities for residents. Together, the 10 projects approved today will reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 64,000 metric tons, the equivalent of taking 14,000 cars off the road for one year. “California is empowering communities on the front lines of the climate crisis to fight pollution and build resilience in their own neighborhoods,” Governor Gavin Newsom said. “This innovative support for community projects across the state will provide environmental, health and economic benefits to Californians for decades to come.”

Photos of the Transform Fresno project, which received a $66.5 million TCC grant in the first round of the program
The California Strategic Growth Council voted unanimously today to approve this funding through the Transformative Climate Communities (TCC) program, which has awarded a total of $230 million to 26 communities since 2016. In total, the The state has allocated $661 million to the TCC program. since 2016. The program is an important part of the Governor’s $54 billion multi-year climate commitment to California to advance economic opportunity and environmental justice in communities across the state.

TCC’s current round of grants will support seven planning grants and the implementation of three climate resilience infrastructure proposals. Planning grants provide pre-construction support to communities to successfully apply to future funding rounds through TCC or other funding sources, while implementation grants fund housing affordable, access to public transit, energy efficiency, building electrification, water and waste management, green infrastructure, air quality, workforce training work, anti-displacement programs and more. The TCC grants approved today will support projects in disadvantaged, unincorporated, and tribal communities across the state:

  • $35,000,000 award at South Los Angeles Eco-Lab
  • $35,000,000 prize at Richmond Rising
  • $24,165,510 award to City of Stockton, Stockton Rising
  • $300,000 Award to San Diego County – Spring Valley SEEDS (Sustainable Environments and Engaged Development Strategies)
  • Reward of $299,922 to the Karuk tribe – Panámnik, sákriiv nukyâavish! (Orleans, we make it strong!)
  • Monterey County $299,113 Award – Climate Prosperity for the Pájaro Valley
  • $217,000 reward at Chicken Ranch Rancheria
  • $299,967 Allensworth Progressive Association Award
  • $300,000 award to the Native American Environmental Protection Coalition
  • $299,800 award to the Wiyot Tribe
“Yôotva (thank you) to the State of California for bringing Tribes into the room and having this opportunity. The Karuk Tribe is the second largest tribe in California and our Indigenous communities, like Orleans, will be among the most impacted environmentally and economically due to new climate realities. Through this planning effort, we can anticipate the crisis,” said Russell Attebery, Tribal Chairman of the Karuk Tribe.

“Community groups like SAJE, SCOPE and TRUST South LA have been advocating for nearly a decade for climate investments to come to the South Los Angeles community and consider the needs of existing community members,” said Marie Patiño. Gutierrez, Director of Policy and Research. at Strategic Actions for a Just Economy and community leader with South LA Eco-Lab. “An investment of this size will greatly benefit our neighbors and support strong tenant and small business protections and policies for our communities over the long term. “The impact of redlining is evident in South Los Angeles. We experience large amounts of air pollution, heavy policing, a lack of green space and polluting industries, with some neighbors living 5 feet from active oil wells,” said South Central Los Angeles resident and Scope member Brian Jointer. “With support from the Transformative Climate Communities program, we want to reimagine a South Los Angeles that has clean air, more parks, free public transportation, and healthier community spaces that provide relief from extreme heat. Thank you for choosing South LA EcoLab as your TCC recipient. As part of TCC’s current funding cycle, the Strategic Growth Council also voted to allocate $10 million of the remaining funds for additional technical assistance as well as a pilot initiative to fund basic infrastructure and development. projects in underfunded unincorporated and tribal communities.

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COVID Health Program Supervisor – United States of America https://metroresearch.org/covid-health-program-supervisor-united-states-of-america/ Fri, 21 Oct 2022 21:28:26 +0000 https://metroresearch.org/covid-health-program-supervisor-united-states-of-america/ Summary of work The Health Program Supervisor will be responsible for developing and conducting COVID-19 awareness activities with Refugee, Immigrant, and Migrant (RIM) communities in Maricopa County. In collaboration with the Senior Health Program Manager, this role will be responsible for the creation and delivery of COVID-19 health education materials, including videos, social media posts […]]]>

Summary of work

The Health Program Supervisor will be responsible for developing and conducting COVID-19 awareness activities with Refugee, Immigrant, and Migrant (RIM) communities in Maricopa County. In collaboration with the Senior Health Program Manager, this role will be responsible for the creation and delivery of COVID-19 health education materials, including videos, social media posts and flyers, dissemination and follow-up of content produced to clients and community organizations, supervision and training. community health workers and conduct qualitative research. The position reports to the Senior Health Program Supervisor of the Arizona Department of Health.

Main responsibilities:

  • Coordinate with the Senior Health Program Manager to develop a targeted outreach plan to reach RIM communities.
  • Develop dissemination and monitoring plan for targeted communities, disseminate and collect analytical information (with support from Senior Health Program Manager).
  • Develop narrative reports.
  • Facilitate activities designed to collect data on knowledge, attitudes, and practices related to COVID-19, particularly regarding vaccine hesitancy and acceptance in different populations and how these change over time with messaging among the RIM communities.
  • Keep up to date with information and research on COVID 19, including new variants of concern, vaccine development, and community transmission levels.
  • Review, edit and provide feedback on produced content and other materials.
  • Participate in weekly bilateral meetings with project managers across the IRC network to share strategies on project deliverables, discuss best practices and address challenges.
  • Coordinate messaging with members of the RIM community on COVID risk mitigation, vaccination, and contact tracing.
  • Identify and organize NRC-RIM COVID health education materials for effective health education campaigns.
  • Maintain and initiate partnerships with community partners.
  • Supervise, train and support community health workers (CHWs) in COVID awareness efforts.
  • Ensure COVID-19 precautions are followed during community interactions, including events.
  • Ensure patient privacy and adhere to federal, state, and local government privacy guidelines and COVID-19 requirements.
  • Follow all IRC policies, procedures and protocols, including compliance with the IRC Way and child protection.

Key Working Relationships:

The position reports to: Senior Health Program Manager
The position directly supervises: Community health workers, trainees and volunteers within the programme.

Indirect report: IRC Tucson Director, IRC HQ
Other internal and/or external contacts:

Internal: IRC staff, interns and volunteers

External: Community partners, faith and faith communities, DES, law enforcement, schools, Maricopa County Department of Public Health, Arizona State Refugee Health Coordinator, and other medical providers.

Job requirements:

Education*:* Undergraduate degree in a related field.

Professional experience: Two or more years of professional work experience; preferably in a public health, nonprofit, or social service setting. Five years of experience in a health-related case management position is preferred.

Demonstrated Skills and Abilities:

  • Experience working with refugees and/or immigrants; cross-cultural or overseas experience accepted.
  • Experience coordinating community health worker programs.
  • Experience in community-based research, including survey design or other data collection and analysis methods
  • Computer proficiency with a focus on Microsoft Office applications (Word, Excel, Teams, Outlook). Proven experience in web-based data entry systems, with both data mining and design preferred.
  • Highly organized self-starter with proven success prioritizing multiple tasks, making critical decisions and delivering results in a fast-paced environment with tight deadlines
  • Strong attention to detail with the ability to prioritize and manage time effectively.
  • Flexibility with a demonstrated ability to maintain responsibility for multiple tasks within the context of a diverse and fast-paced work environment.
  • Strategic, creative, problem solver able to work well independently and as part of a team.
  • Demonstrated understanding of coaching and motivational interviewing
  • Must have a valid driver’s license, active insurance policy and access to reliable transportation.
  • Per Arizona State law, must possess or be eligible to receive a fingerprint authorization card.

Language skills: Fluency in written and spoken English, bilingual ability preferred in Swahili, Kinyarwanda, Arabic, French or other refugee/immigrant language used in Arizona. Cross-cultural understanding and strong communication skills, both written and spoken.

Working environment:**

Hybrid work schedule. Standard office work environment combined with some travel to service delivery area.

COVID-19 vaccination requirements: Consistent with IRC’s obligation to provide and maintain a workplace free from known hazards and our commitment to protect the health of our employees, customers and communities, IRC requires new employees to provide proof of vaccination against COVID-19 in order to be considered for any in-service or hybrid position. All IRC offices in the United States require full vaccination to attend all office functions (eg meetings, trainings).

Commitment to Diversity and Inclusiveness: The IRC is committed to building a diverse organization and a climate of inclusiveness. We strongly encourage applications from candidates who can demonstrate that they can contribute to this goal.

Equal Opportunity Employer: We are an equal opportunity employer and value diversity in our business. We do not discriminate on the basis of race, religion, color, national origin, sex, gender, gender expression, sexual orientation, age, marital status, veteran status or disability status. We will ensure that people with disabilities are provided with reasonable accommodations to participate in the application or interview process, to perform essential job functions, and to receive other employment-related benefits and privileges. Please contact us to request accommodation.

American Benefits: We offer a comprehensive and highly competitive benefits package. In the US, these include: 10 sick days, 10 US statutory holidays, 20-25 paid vacation days depending on role and tenure, medical insurance starting at $120 per month, health care dental starting at $7 per month and vision starting at $5 per month. , FSA for health care and transportation costs, a 403b retirement savings plan with immediately vested consideration, disability and life insurance, and an employee assistance program that is available to our staff and their families to support counseling and care in times of mental health crisis and struggles.

How to register

Please apply on our site:

https://rescue.csod.com/ux/ats/careersite/1/home/requisition/33425?c=rescue

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