Research plan – Metro Research http://metroresearch.org/ Tue, 17 May 2022 21:31:39 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://metroresearch.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/cropped-icon-32x32.png Research plan – Metro Research http://metroresearch.org/ 32 32 Fort Worth to Create Urban Forestry Master Plan – Welcome to the City of Fort Worth https://metroresearch.org/fort-worth-to-create-urban-forestry-master-plan-welcome-to-the-city-of-fort-worth/ Tue, 17 May 2022 21:24:00 +0000 https://metroresearch.org/fort-worth-to-create-urban-forestry-master-plan-welcome-to-the-city-of-fort-worth/ Posted May 17, 2022 The Fort Worth City Council today announced plans to move forward in partnering with the Texas Trees Foundation to create Fort Worth’s first urban forestry master plan, marking the city’s continued momentum in the protection, expansion and management of its green infrastructure. Forests in urban areas generate significant value over time […]]]>

Posted May 17, 2022

The Fort Worth City Council today announced plans to move forward in partnering with the Texas Trees Foundation to create Fort Worth’s first urban forestry master plan, marking the city’s continued momentum in the protection, expansion and management of its green infrastructure.

Forests in urban areas generate significant value over time and provide essential physical, social, economic and environmental benefits that make cities more sustainable and resilient.

“Fort Worth has long demonstrated an unwavering commitment to keeping our infrastructure green; to be the oldest and oldest tree town in the United States in Texas, a designation the town first received in 1978; to the designation of a wildlife sanctuary in 1964 which later became the Fort Worth Nature Center & Refuge; voter approval of a $15 million open space conservation bond proposal this month,” said Mayor Mattie Parker. “Taking the initiative to create a Fort Worth Urban Forestry Master Plan is a perfect next step in our efforts to protect valuable natural amenities that residents will enjoy for generations to come.”

The city’s Department of Developmental Services and the Texas Trees Foundation will lead planning efforts to engage community stakeholders, developers and forestry experts. The comprehensive report will assess current urban forest resources and the city’s urban forest policies and ordinances, recommend appropriate strategies to maintain and improve the urban forest, and provide methods for measuring progress while addressing the many elements of urban forestry in Fort Worth now and in the future.

Several elements of the plan will include identifying strategic partners interested in investing in urban forest growth, identifying priority planting and conservation areas, reassessing the current city ​​and recommending amendments to the Urban Forestry Ordinance.

“Our Foundation’s vision is to create a cleaner, greener, fresher and healthier Texas. For 40 years, we’ve focused our mission on impacting the City of Dallas, and we’re excited to now expand to the City of Fort Worth to highlight the importance of urban forestry and the benefits of trees,” said Janette Monear, CEO of Texas Trees. Foundation. “Trees are a vital pillar of a healthy community and we look forward to working alongside the City of Fort Worth and our funding partners to develop an urban forest master plan that will leave a green legacy for generations to come.” »

The increase in planning initiatives surrounding urban forestry in the city has been championed by Mayor Pro Tem Gyna Bivens due to the recent illegal clear-cutting of trees in the Cross Timbers area, located east of the I-35W. The region consists of a large area with old, drought-stressed, slow-growing trees, many of which predate not only statehood, but also the birth of the United States.

“The East Side of Fort Worth has seen devastating instances of tree loss, and it is absolutely incumbent on us as a city council to ensure responsible development and seek out every opportunity to enhance the preservation of the urban forest” , Bivens said. “I am pleased to lend my full support to the creation of a Fort Worth Urban Forestry Master Plan to ensure we achieve these goals now and in the future.”

Along with the city’s $50,000 contribution using tree fund collections, the Texas Trees Foundation will contribute a minimum of $250,000 to the project, which will come from a combination of partnerships and donations from organizations like Wells. Fargo, Atmos Energy, Texas Trees Foundation and the Worth-based Fort Nicholas Martin Jr. Family Foundation.

“Wells Fargo is committed to providing leadership among financial institutions on sustainability issues and believes that climate change is one of the most pressing environmental and social issues of our time,” said Scott Wallace, Chief Financial Officer. Wells Fargo Regional Banking Services for North Texas. “We are honored to support the Texas Trees Foundation and its important work as part of our commitment to help transition to a low-carbon economy and minimize society’s environmental footprint.”

“Our partnership with the Texas Trees Foundation and the City of Fort Worth aligns with Atmos Energy’s commitment to fueling safe and thriving communities by investing in a safe and healthy environment for all,” said Chris Felan, vice – President of Rates and Regulatory Affairs of Atmos Energy. . “We are committed to helping the City of Fort Worth prosper and creating a strategic roadmap for sustainable and safe forest management and we are honored to help sponsor the development of this historic urban forest plan.

The collaborative work between the Texas Trees Foundation, the City of Fort Worth, Atmos Energy, Wells Fargo and the Nicholas Martin Jr. Family Foundation is just one more example of the city’s commitment to breaking down barriers through innovative thinking and partnerships.

“Just as a land use plan guides urban planning and future development, we hope that a research-driven urban forest master plan will help facilitate a more efficient, effective and efficient decision-making process. consistent for the entire community, including city officials, nonprofits, developers and landlords,” said Nicholas Martin Jr. Family Foundation representative Nick K. Martin.

The Texas Trees Foundation has served as a catalyst in creating reimagined green spaces through research-driven projects and programs such as their Cool Schools program and the NeighborWoods program.

Photo: Planning efforts will assess current urban forest resources as well as municipal policies and ordinances related to the urban forest.

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India plans dam project as China seeks to divert river https://metroresearch.org/india-plans-dam-project-as-china-seeks-to-divert-river/ Sun, 15 May 2022 19:30:02 +0000 https://metroresearch.org/india-plans-dam-project-as-china-seeks-to-divert-river/ The proposed dam in the upper part of Arunachal will be able to store around 10 billion m3. m (BCM) of water, Jal Shakti Minister Gajendra Singh Shekhawat said in an interview. By storage, the Indira Sagar Dam is the tallest in India at 12.2 BCM. The proposed dam is expected to involve an investment […]]]>

The proposed dam in the upper part of Arunachal will be able to store around 10 billion m3. m (BCM) of water, Jal Shakti Minister Gajendra Singh Shekhawat said in an interview. By storage, the Indira Sagar Dam is the tallest in India at 12.2 BCM.

The proposed dam is expected to involve an investment of approximately 50,000 crore and is part of the proposed multipurpose storage project for Upper Siang which will also generate hydropower.

China’s 14th Five-Year Plan proposed to build a massive dam across the Brahmaputra River, known in China as Yarlung Tsangpo, a development that has raised concerns in India due to its strategic ramifications. Relations between India and China deteriorated after troops clashed along the Himalayan border killing 20 Indian soldiers in June 2020.

Water during the lean season in the Brahmaputra comes from melting snow in the mountains of the Tibetan plateau. India’s plan is to release water from the dam to maintain water security in case China builds structures to divert water. Moreover, in the event that China releases water from its headwaters, such a dam will also help store water to prevent flooding.

In response to a question about China’s plans to build hydropower projects on the Great Bend, just above Indian Territory, where the Brahmaputra turns around, Shekhawat said: “We have planned a project for its mitigation. in Yingkiong for the construction of a dam in the heights of Arunachal Pradesh. And it will probably be one of the biggest dams in India. We will hold the water there and release it during the lean season when there is no rain to ensure (water) safety. »

While run-of-the-river (RoR) projects harness seasonal river flows to generate electricity, reservoir projects involve water storage, which addresses the risks associated with seasonal changes in flow. nature and the availability of river water. Of the eight river basins of Arunachal Pradesh, Subansiri, Lohit and Siang are of strategic importance as they are closer to the border with China.

“Dams aren’t just for irrigation or power generation; they also act as an attenuating cushion to prevent flooding. Say, if ever from the upper reaches there is a release of water, even then we will have a cushion to control the release of that water,” Shekhawat added.

According to Indian planners, rainfall in China contributes only 7% of the flow of three Brahmaputra tributaries – Subansiri, Siang and Lohit – which originate in China.

“The Brahmaputra River has a huge quantum of 500 BCM (billion cubic meters) of water flowing through it. Of this number, more than 75% come from our catchment area. This is the reason why we are not much affected by it. But outside of the monsoon season, when the river receives water from melting snow, we have no water in our catchment area. So if they build a dam and divert water out of monsoon seasons, it will impact from Arunachal Pradesh to Bangladesh. Previously, they (China) said they were doing nothing. Later, they said they were building run-of-the-river hydro projects. And now there’s evidence that maybe they can work on water transfer as well,” Shekhawat said.

Of the 2,880 km in length of the Brahmaputra River, 1,625 km is in Tibet, 918 km in India and 337 km in Bangladesh. Of a total catchment area of ​​580,000 km2, 50% is located in Tibet, 34% in India and the rest in Bangladesh and Bhutan.

“We have clarification on other things. There is some resistance at the local level, which the government of Arunachal is working on. The total cost should be approximately 50,000 crores. The cost is irrelevant. It should be built,” Shekhawat said.

The total hydroelectric generation potential of the northeastern states of India and Bhutan is about 58 gigawatts (GW). Of this, Arunachal alone accounts for 50.328 GW, the highest in India.

Experts said China’s plans may not have a major impact on the Indian side.

“Whatever flow of the Brahmaputra River that occurs in India, the majority comes from the rainfall that occurs in the Indian region. So the water that China intends to use will not have a major impact on the river on the Indian side,” said Anjal Prakash, research director at the Indian School’s Bharti Institute of Public Policy. of Business of Hyderabad.

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US companies in China cut revenue forecasts and investment plans https://metroresearch.org/us-companies-in-china-cut-revenue-forecasts-and-investment-plans/ Tue, 10 May 2022 05:08:13 +0000 https://metroresearch.org/us-companies-in-china-cut-revenue-forecasts-and-investment-plans/ Truck drivers, like the one pictured here in Shanghai in late April, generally must present valid negative virus tests in order to move goods between cities in China. The American Chamber of Commerce in China said members reported varying implementation of Covid controls by city and province. CGV | Visual Group China | Getty Images […]]]>

Truck drivers, like the one pictured here in Shanghai in late April, generally must present valid negative virus tests in order to move goods between cities in China. The American Chamber of Commerce in China said members reported varying implementation of Covid controls by city and province.

CGV | Visual Group China | Getty Images

BEIJING — More U.S. businesses in China are cutting revenue expectations and plans for future investments as Covid controls drag on, a new survey finds.

Between the end of March and the end of April, the share of respondents reporting an impact from Covid restrictions rose by 4 percentage points to 58%, according to a survey by the American Chamber of Commerce in China published on Monday.

While not a big increase, 4 or 5 percentage points each month could be “very significant” if Covid controls persist for another five months, Michael Hart, president of AmCham, told CNBC during an interview. a telephone interview.

Asked what impact the Covid restrictions will have if they last into next year, more than 70% of respondents said their income or profits would be reduced.

The latest study, conducted from April 29 to May 5, covered 121 companies operating in China. This period included the latest Covid restrictions in the capital Beijing.

In two, three, four years, I predict a massive drop in investment in China because no new projects are launched, because people cannot come in and look at space.

Michael Hart

President, AmCham China

The previous survey was conducted with AmCham Shanghai in late March, just as Shanghai’s initial plan for a two-part lockdown began. These measures lasted much longer than the initial week.

Over the past few days, the city of Beijing postponed the reopening of schools until further notice and ordered all non-essential businesses in a major business district to temporarily close or have their staff work from home.

“There are very few aspects of the economy that seem to be working,” said one survey respondent in the report, which withheld the respondent’s name and location. “[While] COVID-19 restrictions can be managed, which [will be increasingly difficult to] managing is the lack of overall growth in the economy and what appear to be growing economic headwinds.”

Companies scale back investment plans in China

Prolonged Covid controls – as mainland China grapples with its worst virus outbreak since the start of 2020 – have further discouraged US companies from investing in the country, the AmCham survey found.

The percentage of respondents reporting a decrease in investments following the latest outbreak and restrictions rose to 26% from 17% a month earlier.

Those declaring an investment lag fell slightly to 26% from 29% in the previous survey. The proportion who said it’s too early to predict or were undecided on the impact on investment plans rose to 44% in the latest survey, from 30% in the previous study .

Official figures show a steady increase in foreign direct investment from all countries to China, up 31.7 percent year-on-year in the first quarter to $59.01 billion.

China’s Ministry of Commerce did not comment until its regular press conference on Thursday. Asked at the end of April about the challenges of foreign companies, the ministry said it would do everything possible to ensure the resumption of work and production.

Since China tightened border restrictions in 2020 to control Covid transmission from travelers into the country, foreign trade organizations have said it has been difficult to bring in staff. This is because there is a lack of international flights to China and quarantine delays on arrival of at least two weeks, if not longer.

“If you want an investment, you have to allow travel,” Hart said, noting the impact will be felt in the long run.

“In two, three, four years, I predict a massive drop in investment in China because no new projects are launched, because people cannot go in and look into space,” he said. declared.

If Covid controls persist next year, 53% of respondents to AmCham’s latest survey said they would cut back on investment in China.

Learn more about China from CNBC Pro

By sector, technology and research and development companies reported the highest impact of Covid controls on their investment plans, with 53% of respondents in the sector expecting delays or cuts.

In contrast, consumer companies were the only ones to report plans to increase investment, despite accounting for just 4% of industry members. For industry, 36% planned to cut investment, while 29% said they would delay investment following the latest outbreak.

The consumer sector was also the only sector to report some increase in annual revenue projections despite the impact of Covid, at 3% of respondents. However, the majority of consumer companies, 69%, said they were reducing their revenue forecast for the year.

Business has not fully recovered

While Shanghai authorities have announced whitelists that allow just under 2,000 companies to resume production, AmCham’s latest survey found that among respondents with operations in Shanghai, 15% said that they hadn’t reopened yet.

This does not mean that the majority are completely back to work.

Hart said anecdotally that some companies he spoke to last week in Shanghai were operating at 30% to 50% capacity. Many suppliers remain closed, while shipping parts and goods to customers is still difficult, he said.

Several different cities across China have adopted some form of lockdown, and truck drivers often need special passes and frequent negative virus tests to transport goods.

From the experience of our own businesses in the US, Europe and other markets, we have found that other countries have adopted a different strategy. We’re just asking for a little more balance.

Michael Hart

President, AmCham China

Part of the difficulty is the inconsistent implementation across provinces and cities of what China calls its “dynamic zero-Covid” policy, Hart said.

At the local level, “government officials are looking for practical ways for businesses to fix their problems and get back to work, as these people are judged on their economic performance,” Hart said. “When we talk to the government at [a] high level, it’s not a focus on economics. It’s a focus on health and reducing Covid.”

“Based solely on the experience of our own companies in the United States, Europe and other markets, we have seen that other countries have adopted a different strategy,” he said. “We’re just asking for a little more balance.”

Last week, Chinese President Xi Jinping led a meeting that stressed the country must “resolutely fight” against any questioning of virus control policies. The meeting also warned of the economic consequences if China does not stick to its aggressive zero Covid policy.

In November, China’s Center for Disease Control and Prevention published a study which warned that switching to other countries’ “coexistence” strategy would likely lead to hundreds of thousands of daily cases – devastating the national medical system.

For Monday, mainland China reported 349 new Covid cases with symptoms and 3,077 without symptoms, mostly in Shanghai – which reported six deaths for the day.

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College of Nursing set for record promotion https://metroresearch.org/college-of-nursing-set-for-record-promotion/ Sat, 07 May 2022 18:00:00 +0000 https://metroresearch.org/college-of-nursing-set-for-record-promotion/ This weekend, the section of Ohio Stadium reserved for College of Nursing graduate students might seem a little busier than usual. A record 700 college graduates are expected to celebrate the start on Sunday. It is a number and a class that speaks of passion, perseverance and purpose. For many of these students, much of […]]]>

This weekend, the section of Ohio Stadium reserved for College of Nursing graduate students might seem a little busier than usual.

A record 700 college graduates are expected to celebrate the start on Sunday. It is a number and a class that speaks of passion, perseverance and purpose. For many of these students, much of their health care training took place during a deadly pandemic.

For Cincinnati native Aarhea Hope, acting as a caregiver when her grandmother suffered from stage four colon cancer inspired her desire to become a nurse.

“My mom and I helped her out and just took care of her,” Hope said. “That experience really made me understand what I wanted to do because of how it made me feel. You know, you get that feeling inside and you’re like, ‘Oh, maybe it’s what I’m supposed to do.”

Hope is a first-generation college student who began her college career on the Newark campus. She admitted it was a challenge at first until she found peers and mentors who helped her succeed.

After graduating, Hope will go to Emory University to pursue a doctorate as a family nurse practitioner. From her job training to her education, she feels Ohio State has prepared her well.

“I feel like all the boxes at Ohio State have been checked for me to succeed at any institution,” she said. “Looking at me, as a freshman, you couldn’t tell me I was moving to Atlanta, going to Emory and going to be a doctor. [of nursing]. Because that wasn’t my plan at first. But at Ohio State, they really instilled that confidence in me and made me realize how much potential I had.

Laura Beth KalvasFor PhD candidate Laura Beth Kalvas, this will be the next chapter in a journey across Ohio State that began as an undergraduate student in 2009. A Presidential Fellowship and continuing education grants have helped Kalvas pursue her career at the College of Nursing.

“I’m really thrilled with Ohio State’s choice,” she said.

She felt the decision was validated at a conference this spring when she spoke to her peers about the positive reputation of the doctoral nursing program.

“It’s just nice to hear. When you’re inside, I don’t know if you still know, so you’re talking to people who aren’t going to Ohio State and you’re like, ‘Oh wow. I like Ohio State, but other people also think it’s good.

As a researcher, Kalvas has focused on sleep disturbances and delirium in children under 2 years old in intensive care units.

Kalvas will continue his research at Ohio State. She obtained a postdoctoral fellowship from the Center for Clinical and Translational Sciences. She plans to continue to expand her research on how hospital conditions might be linked to delirium in children and to develop interventions in the critical care environment to promote sleep and reduce the risk of delirium.

“I’m training in intervention research and doing observational research in my doctoral work,” she says. “So how do I take what I observe and act on it to improve outcomes, and then I also continue to look at this relationship between sleep and delirium and children.”

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ARVINAS, INC. Management report and analysis of the financial situation and operating results. (Form 10-Q) https://metroresearch.org/arvinas-inc-management-report-and-analysis-of-the-financial-situation-and-operating-results-form-10-q/ Thu, 05 May 2022 20:55:10 +0000 https://metroresearch.org/arvinas-inc-management-report-and-analysis-of-the-financial-situation-and-operating-results-form-10-q/ You should read the following discussion and analysis of financial condition and results of operations together with our unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements and the related notes appearing elsewhere in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q and the consolidated financial statements and the related notes and discussion and analysis of financial condition and results of […]]]>
You should read the following discussion and analysis of financial condition and
results of operations together with our unaudited condensed consolidated
financial statements and the related notes appearing elsewhere in this Quarterly
Report on Form 10-Q and the consolidated financial statements and the related
notes and discussion and analysis of financial condition and results of
operations in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31,
2021 filed on February 28, 2022. This discussion contains forward-looking
statements that involve risks and uncertainties. As a result of many factors,
such as those set forth in the section titled "Risk Factors" and elsewhere in
this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q and in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the
year ended December 31, 2021, filed on February 28, 2022, our actual results may
differ materially from those anticipated in or implied by these forward-looking
statements.

                                    Overview

Our Business

We are a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company dedicated to improving the
lives of patients suffering from debilitating and life-threatening diseases
through the discovery, development and commercialization of therapies to degrade
disease-causing proteins. We use our PROTAC Discovery Engine, proprietary
technology platform to engineer proteolysis targeting chimeras, or PROTAC
targeted protein degraders, that are designed to harness the body's own natural
protein disposal system to selectively remove disease-causing proteins. We
believe that our targeted protein degradation approach is a therapeutic modality
that may provide distinct advantages over existing modalities, including
traditional small molecule therapies and gene-based medicines. Our small
molecule PROTAC technology has the potential to address a broad range of
intracellular disease targets, including those representing up to the 80% of
proteins that currently cannot be addressed by existing small molecule
therapies, commonly referred to as "undruggable" targets. We are using our
PROTAC Discovery Engine to build an extensive pipeline of protein degradation
product candidates to target diseases in oncology (including immuno-oncology),
neuroscience, and other therapeutic areas. Our three lead product candidates are
bavdegalutamide, ARV-471, and ARV-766.

Bavdegalutamide


We are developing bavdegalutamide, an investigational orally bioavailable PROTAC
protein degrader targeting the androgen receptor protein, or AR, for the
treatment of men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer, or mCRPC.
We initiated a Phase 1 clinical trial of bavdegalutamide designed to assess the
safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of bavdegalutamide, which also
includes measures of anti-tumor activity as secondary endpoints, including
reduction in prostate specific antigen, or PSA, a well-recognized biomarker of
prostate cancer progression. We received fast track designation for
bavdegalutamide for mCRPC in May 2019. We have completed dose escalation in the
Phase 1 clinical trial. In the fourth quarter of 2020, we initiated ARDENT, the
Phase 2 single agent expansion portion of the bavdegalutamide clinical trial. In
the fourth quarter of 2021, we initiated a Phase 1b clinical trial with
bavdegalutamide in combination with abiraterone for the treatment of men with
mCRPC. In the second quarter of 2022, we intend to initiate discussions with the
U.S. Food and Drug Administration, or FDA, about the potential for an
accelerated approval pathway with bavdegalutamide in molecularly defined mCRPC
and finalize a partnership for a companion diagnostic. In the second half of
2022, we plan to initiate a pivotal trial for patients with AR T878/H875 tumor
mutations. We anticipate that future studies will be planned to explore the
potential to treat earlier-line patients with AR-dependent tumors who may
benefit from bavdegalutamide therapy.

ARV-471


We are developing ARV-471, an investigational orally bioavailable PROTAC protein
degrader targeting the estrogen receptor protein, or ER, for the treatment of
patients with locally advanced or metastatic ER positive / HER2 negative breast
cancer. We initiated a Phase 1 clinical trial of ARV-471 designed to assess the
safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of ARV-471, which also includes
measures of anti-tumor activity as secondary endpoints. In the fourth quarter of
2020, we initiated a Phase 1b cohort expansion of ARV-471 in combination with
Ibrance® (palbociclib). We have completed dose escalation in the Phase 1
clinical trial. In the first quarter of 2021, we initiated VERITAC, the Phase 2
single agent expansion cohort of the ARV-471 clinical trial. In July 2021, we
entered into a collaboration agreement with Pfizer Inc., or Pfizer, pursuant to
which we
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Contents


granted Pfizer worldwide coexclusive rights to develop and commercialize
ARV-471. In December 2021, we presented data from the dose escalation portion of
the Phase 1/2 clinical trial at the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium. In the
second half of 2022, we plan to present data from the VERITAC Phase 2 dose
expansion (with patients dosed at 200 and 500 mg) and present safety data from
the Phase 1b combination study with palbociclib. Additionally, in 2022, we plan
to initiate a Phase 1b clinical trial with ARV-471 in combination with
everolimus in patients with metastatic breast cancer, initiate a Phase 1b
combination trial with cyclin-dependent kinase, or CDK, inhibitors or other
targeted therapies, initiate a Phase 2 clinical trial in patients with early
breast cancer in the neoadjuvant setting and initiate two Phase 3 clinical
trials in patients with metastatic breast cancer as a monotherapy and in
combination.

ARV-766


We are developing ARV-766, an investigational orally bioavailable PROTAC protein
degrader for the treatment of men with mCRPC. In preclinical studies, ARV-766
degraded all tested resistance-driving point mutations of AR, including L702H, a
mutation associated with treatment with abiraterone and other AR-pathway
therapies, which bavdegalutamide did not degrade in preclinical studies. In
2021, we initiated a Phase 1 clinical trial for ARV-766 designed to assess the
safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of ARV-766, which also includes
measures of anti-tumor activity as secondary endpoints, including reduction in
PSA. In the second half of 2022, we plan to present Phase 1 dose escalation data
and initiate a Phase 2 expansion trial for the treatment of men with mCRPC.

Bavdegalutamide, ARV-471 and ARV-766 have all demonstrated potent and selective
protein degradation in our preclinical studies. We believe favorable clinical
trial results in these initial oncology programs would provide validation of our
platform as a new therapeutic modality for the potential treatment of diseases
caused by dysregulated intracellular proteins regardless of therapeutic area.

Our operations


As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, many companies have experienced
disruptions in their operations and in the markets they serve. We have instated
some and may take additional precautionary measures intended to help ensure our
employees' well-being and minimize business disruption. We temporarily shut down
our laboratories in mid-March 2020 and initiated work with biology contract
research organizations, or CROs, but have since reopened our laboratories and
our office-based employees are working in a hybrid of remote and in-person work.
We considered the impact of COVID-19 on the assumptions and estimates used and
determined that there were no material adverse impacts on our results of
operations and financial position as of March 31, 2022. The full extent of the
future impacts of COVID-19 on our operations remains uncertain. A prolonged
outbreak could have a material adverse impact on our financial results and
business operations, including the timing and our ability to complete certain
clinical trials and other efforts required to advance our preclinical pipeline.

We commenced operations in 2013. Our operations to date have been limited to
organizing and staffing our company, business planning, raising capital,
conducting discovery and research activities, filing patent applications,
identifying potential product candidates, undertaking preclinical studies and
clinical trials and establishing arrangements with third parties for the
manufacture of initial quantities of our product candidates. To date, we have
not generated any revenue from product sales and have financed our operations
primarily through sales of our equity interests, proceeds from our
collaborations, grant funding and debt financing. Since inception through
March 31, 2022, we raised approximately $1.3 billion in gross proceeds from the
sale of equity instruments and the exercise of stock options and had received an
aggregate of $780.5 million in payments primarily from collaboration partners.

We are a clinical-stage company. Bavdegalutamide and ARV-471 are each in Phase
1/2 clinical trials, ARV-766 is in a Phase 1 clinical trial and our other drug
discovery activities are at the research and preclinical development stages. Our
ability to generate revenue from product sales sufficient to achieve
profitability will depend heavily on the successful development and eventual
commercialization of one or more of our product candidates. Since inception, we
have incurred significant operating losses. We expect to continue to incur
significant expenses and increasing operating losses for at least the next
several years. Our net loss was $63.4 million for the three months ended
March 31, 2022. As of March 31, 2022, we had an accumulated deficit of $746.3
million.
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Contents


Our total operating expenses were $84.2 million for the three months ended
March 31, 2022. We anticipate that our expenses will increase substantially due
to costs associated with our ongoing and anticipated clinical activities for
bavdegalutamide, ARV-471, and ARV-766, development activities associated with
our other product candidates, research activities in oncology, neurological and
other disease areas to expand our pipeline, hiring additional personnel in
research, clinical trials, quality and other functional areas, increased
expenses incurred with contract manufacturing organizations, or CMOs, to supply
us with product for our preclinical and clinical studies and CROs for the
synthesis of compounds in our pre-clinical development activities, as well as
other associated costs including the management of our intellectual property
portfolio.

We do not expect to generate revenue from sales of any product for many years,
if ever. Accordingly, we will need to obtain substantial additional funding in
connection with our continuing operations. If we are unable to raise capital
when needed or on attractive terms, we could be forced to delay, reduce or
eliminate our research or product development programs or any future
commercialization efforts, or to relinquish valuable rights to our technologies,
future revenue streams, research programs or product candidates or grant
licenses on terms that may not be favorable to us.

                         Financial Operations Overview

Revenue


To date, we have not generated any revenue from product sales and do not expect
to generate any revenue from the sale of products in the foreseeable future. Our
revenues to date have been generated through research collaboration and license
agreements. Revenue is recognized ratably over our expected performance period
under each agreement. We expect that any revenue for the next several years will
be derived primarily from our current collaboration agreements and any
additional collaborations that we may enter into in the future. To date, we have
not received any sales-based milestone payments or royalties under any of the
collaboration agreements.

Genentech License Agreement


In September 2015, we entered into an Option and License Agreement with
Genentech, Inc. and F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd, collectively referred to as
Genentech, focused on PROTAC targeted protein degrader discovery and research
for target proteins, or Targets, based on our proprietary platform technology,
other than excluded Targets as described below. This collaboration was expanded
in November 2017 through an Amended and Restated Option, License and
Collaboration Agreement, which we refer to as the Restated Genentech Agreement.

Under the Restated Genentech Agreement, Genentech has the right to designate up
to ten Targets for further discovery and research utilizing our PROTAC platform
technology. Genentech may designate as a Target any protein to which a PROTAC
targeted protein degrader, by design, binds to achieve its mechanism of action,
subject to certain exclusions. Genentech also has the right to remove a Target
from the collaboration and substitute a different Target that is not an excluded
Target at any time prior to us commencing research on such Target or in certain
circumstances following commencement of research by us.

At the time we entered into the original agreement with Genentech we received an
upfront payment of $11.0 million, and at the time we entered into the Restated
Genentech Agreement, we received an additional $34.5 million in upfront and
expansion target payments. We are eligible to receive up to an aggregate of
$27.5 million in additional expansion target payments if Genentech exercises its
options for all remaining Targets. We are also eligible to receive payments
aggregating up to $44.0 million per Target upon the achievement of specified
development milestones; payments aggregating up to $52.5 million per Target
(assuming approval of two indications) subject to the achievement of specified
regulatory milestones; and payments aggregating up to $60.0 million per PROTAC
targeted protein degrader directed against the applicable Target, subject to the
achievement of specified sales milestones. These milestone payments are subject
to reduction if we do not have a valid patent claim covering the licensed PROTAC
targeted protein degrader at the time the milestone is achieved. We are also
eligible to receive, on net sales of licensed PROTAC targeted protein degraders,
mid-single digit royalties, which may be subject to reductions.
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Pfizer Research Collaboration Agreement


In December 2017, we entered into a Research Collaboration and License Agreement
with Pfizer, setting forth our collaboration to identify or optimize PROTAC
targeted protein degraders that mediate for degradation of Targets, using our
proprietary platform technology that are identified in the agreement or
subsequently selected by Pfizer, subject to certain exclusions. We refer to this
agreement as the Pfizer Research Collaboration Agreement.

Under the Pfizer Research Collaboration Agreement, Pfizer has designated a
number of initial Targets. For each identified Target, we and Pfizer will
conduct a separate research program pursuant to a research plan. Pfizer may make
substitutions for any of the initial Target candidates, subject to the stage of
research for such Target.

In the year ended December 31, 2018, we received an upfront non-refundable
payment and certain additional payments totaling $28.0 million in exchange for
use of our technology license and to fund Pfizer-related research as defined
within the Pfizer Research Collaboration Agreement. We are eligible to receive
up to an additional $37.5 million in non-refundable option payments if Pfizer
exercises its options for all targets under the Pfizer Research Collaboration
Agreement. We are also entitled to receive up to $225.0 million in development
milestone payments and up to $550.0 million in sales-based milestone payments
for all designated targets under the Pfizer Research Collaboration Agreement, as
well as mid- to high-single digit tiered royalties, which may be subject to
reductions, on net sales of PROTAC targeted protein degrader-related products.
We received payments totaling $3.5 million in the quarter ended March 31, 2022,
and $1.2 million and $4.4 million in the years ended December 31, 2021 and 2020,
respectively, for additional targets and services.

Bayer collaboration agreement


In June 2019, we entered into a Collaboration and License Agreement, or the
Bayer Collaboration Agreement, with Bayer AG, or, together with its controlled
affiliates, Bayer, setting forth our collaboration to identify or optimize
PROTAC targeted protein degraders that mediate for degradation of Targets, using
our proprietary platform technology, that are selected by Bayer, subject to
certain exclusions and limitations. The Bayer Collaboration Agreement became
effective in July 2019.

Under the Bayer Collaboration Agreement, we and Bayer conduct a research program
pursuant to separate research plans mutually agreed to by us and Bayer and
tailored to each Target selected by Bayer. Bayer may make substitutions for any
such initial Target candidates, subject to certain conditions and based on the
stage of research for such Target. During the term of the Bayer Collaboration
Agreement, we are not permitted, either directly or indirectly, to design,
identify, discover or develop any small molecule pharmacologically-active agent
whose primary mechanism of action is, by design, directed to the inhibition or
degradation of any Target selected or reserved by Bayer, or grant any license,
covenant not to sue or other right to any third party in the field of human
disease under the licensed intellectual property for the conduct of such
activities.

Under the terms of the Bayer Collaboration Agreement, we received an aggregate
upfront non-refundable payment of $17.5 million. Bayer is committed to fund a
total of $12.0 million in research funding payments through 2023, of which $10.5
million was received through March 31, 2022, subject to potential increases if
our costs for research activities exceed the research funding payments allocated
to a Target and certain conditions are met. We are also eligible to receive up
to $197.5 million in development milestone payments and up to $490.0 million in
sales-based milestone payments for all designated Targets. In addition, we are
eligible to receive, on net sales of PROTAC targeted protein degrader-related
products, mid-single digit to low-double digit tiered royalties, which may be
subject to reductions.

Pfizer ARV-471 Collaboration Agreement


In July 2021, we entered into we entered into a collaboration agreement with
Pfizer, or the ARV-471 Collaboration Agreement, pursuant to which we granted
Pfizer worldwide co-exclusive rights to develop and commercialize products
containing our proprietary compound ARV-471, or the Licensed Products.

Under the ARV-471 collaborative agreement, we received an initial non-refundable payment of $650.0 million. Additionally, we are eligible to receive up to an additional amount $1.4 billion in conditional payments

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based on specified regulatory and commercial milestones for licensed products. Of the total contingent payments, $400 million in the regulatory milestones are linked to marketing authorizations and $1.0 billion are tied to sales-based milestones.


We and Pfizer will share equally (50/50) all development costs (including costs
for conducting any clinical trials) for the Licensed Products, subject to
certain exceptions. Except for certain regions described below, we will also
share equally (50/50) all profits and losses in commercialization and medical
affairs activities for the Licensed Products in all other countries, subject to
certain exceptions.

We will be the marketing authorization holder and, subject to marketing
approval, book sales in the United States, while Pfizer will hold marketing
authorizations outside the United States. We will determine with Pfizer which,
if any, regions within the world will be solely commercialized by one party, and
in such region the parties will adjust their share of all profits and losses for
the Licensed Products based on the role each party will be performing.

Unless earlier terminated in accordance with its terms, the ARV-471
Collaboration Agreement will expire on a Licensed Product-by-Licensed Product
and country-by-country basis when such Licensed Products are no longer
commercialized or developed for commercialization in such country. Pfizer may
terminate the ARV-471 Collaboration Agreement for convenience in its entirety or
on a region-by-region basis subject to certain notice periods. Either party may
terminate the ARV-471 Collaboration Agreement for the other party's uncured
material breach or insolvency. Subject to applicable terms of the ARV-471
Collaboration Agreement, including certain payments to Pfizer upon termination
for our uncured material breach, effective upon termination of the ARV-471
Collaboration Agreement, we are entitled to retain specified licenses to be able
to continue to exploit the Licensed Products.

Subject to specified exceptions, we and Pfizer have each agreed not to directly
or indirectly research, develop, or commercialize any competing products outside
of the ARV-471 Collaboration Agreement anywhere in the world during the term of
the ARV-471 Collaboration Agreement.

Functionnary costs

Our operating expenses since inception consist solely of research and development expenses and general and administrative expenses.

Research and development costs


Research and development expenses consist primarily of costs incurred for our
research activities, including our discovery efforts, and the development of our
product candidates, and include:

•salaries, benefits and other related costs, including stock-based compensation expenses, for personnel engaged in research and development functions;


•expenses incurred under agreements with third parties, including CROs and other
third parties that conduct research and preclinical activities on our behalf as
well as third parties that manufacture our product candidates for use in our
preclinical studies and clinical trials;

• the costs of external consultants, including their fees, stock-based compensation and associated travel expenses;

•costs of laboratory supplies and development of preclinical studies and clinical trial materials;

•expenses related to installations, which include direct depreciation of equipment and expenses allocated to rent and maintenance of installations and other operating expenses; and

•Third party license fees.

We expense research and development costs when incurred.

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We typically use our employee and infrastructure resources across our
development programs, and as such, do not track all of our internal research and
development expenses on a program-by-program basis. The following table
summarizes our research and development expenses for our AR program, which
includes bavdegalutamide and ARV-766, ER program, which includes ARV-471, and
all other platform and exploratory research and development costs:

                                               For the Three Months Ended
                                                       March 31,
(in millions)                                       2022                   2021
AR program development costs           $         16.1                    $  7.2
ER program development costs                     14.8                       5.6
Other research and development costs             33.1                      

22.1

Total research and development costs   $         64.0                    $ 

34.9



Research and development activities are central to our business model. We expect
that our research and development expenses will continue to increase
substantially for the foreseeable future as we conduct clinical trials for
bavdegalutamide, ARV-471 and ARV-766, including our ongoing Phase 1/2 clinical
trials for bavdegalutamide and ARV-471 and our ongoing Phase 1 clinical trial
for ARV-766, and continue to discover and develop additional product candidates.
Research and development expenses related to ARV-471 are shared equally with
Pfizer from July 22, 2021, the effective date of the ARV-471 Collaboration
Agreement. The ER program development costs in the table above reflect the cost
sharing with Pfizer.

We cannot reasonably estimate or determine with certainty the duration and costs
of future clinical trials of bavdegalutamide, ARV-471 and ARV-766 or any other
product candidate we may develop or if, when, or to what extent we will generate
revenue from the commercialization and sale of any product candidate for which
we obtain marketing approval. We may never succeed in obtaining marketing
approval for any product candidate. The successful development and
commercialization of our product candidates is highly uncertain. This is due to
the numerous risks and uncertainties associated with developing drugs, including
the uncertainty of:

•the success of preclinical studies;

•the successful initiation of clinical trials;

•successful enrollment of patients and completion of clinical trials;

•receipt and related conditions of marketing authorizations from applicable regulatory authorities;

•obtain and maintain patent and trade secret protection and regulatory exclusivity for our product candidates;

• enter into agreements with third-party manufacturers, or establish manufacturing capabilities, for the clinical and commercial supply of our product candidates;

•establish sales, marketing and distribution capabilities and initiate commercial sales of our products, if and when approved, whether alone or in collaboration with others;

•the acceptance of our products, if approved, by patients, the medical community and third-party payers;

•obtain and maintain third-party coverage and adequate reimbursement;

• maintain an acceptable continuing safety profile of products after approval; and

•effective competition with other therapies.

A change in the outcome of any of these variables relative to the development of a product candidate could mean a significant change in the costs and schedule associated with the development of that product candidate. For example, if the US Food and Drug Administrationor the FDA, or other regulatory agency

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authority were to require us to conduct clinical trials beyond those that we
anticipate will be required for the completion of clinical development of a
product candidate, or if we experience significant delays in our clinical trials
due to patient enrollment or other reasons, we would be required to expend
significant additional financial resources and time on the completion of
clinical development.

General and administrative expenses


General and administrative expenses consist primarily of salaries and other
related costs, including stock-based compensation for personnel in our
executive, finance, business development and administrative functions. General
and administrative expenses also include legal fees relating to intellectual
property and corporate matters; professional fees for accounting, auditing, tax
and consulting services; insurance costs; travel expenses; and facility-related
expenses, which include direct depreciation costs and allocated expenses for
rent and maintenance of facilities and other operating costs.

We expect that our general and administrative expenses will increase in the
future as we increase our personnel headcount to support increased research and
development activities relating to our product candidates. We also expect to
incur increased expenses associated with being a public company, including costs
of accounting, audit, legal, regulatory and tax-related services associated with
maintaining compliance with the Nasdaq Stock Market and Securities and Exchange
Commission requirements; director and officer insurance costs; and investor and
public relations costs.

Income Taxes
Since our inception in 2013, we have not recorded any U.S. federal or state
income tax benefits for the net losses we have incurred in any year or for our
federal or state earned research and development tax credits, due to our
uncertainty of realizing a benefit from those items. As of December 31, 2021, we
had federal net operating loss carryforwards of $373.6 million, which begin to
expire in 2033, state and local net operating loss carryforwards of
$346.9 million, and federal and state research and development tax credit
carryforwards of $15.2 million and $4.5 million, respectively, which begin to
expire in 2033 and 2036, respectively. We expected to fully utilize these net
operating loss and credit carryforwards in the current year due to taxable
income resulting from revenue recognition for tax purposes from our ARV-471
Collaboration Agreement and the capitalization of qualified research and
development expenses incurred on or after January 1, 2022. The revenue
recognition and capitalization of research expenses are timing differences for
tax purposes and deferred tax assets were established. We have provided a
valuation allowance against the full amount of the deferred tax assets since, in
the opinion of management, based upon our earnings history, it is more likely
than not that the benefits will not be realized.

As of March 31, 2022, Arvinas, Inc. had four wholly-owned subsidiaries organized
as C-corporations: Arvinas Operations, Inc., Arvinas Androgen Receptor, Inc.,
Arvinas Estrogen Receptor, Inc., and Arvinas Winchester, Inc. Prior to December
31, 2018, these subsidiaries were separate filers for federal tax purposes.

                         Critical Accounting Estimates

Our management's discussion and analysis of financial condition and results of
operations is based on our unaudited condensed consolidated financial
statements, which have been prepared in accordance with generally accepted
accounting principles in the United States. The preparation of our condensed
consolidated financial statements and related disclosures requires us to make
estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and
liabilities, costs and expenses and the disclosure of contingent assets and
liabilities in our condensed consolidated financial statements. We base our
estimates on historical experience, known trends and events and various other
factors that we believe are reasonable under the circumstances, the results of
which form the basis for making judgments about the carrying values of assets
and liabilities that are not readily apparent from other sources. We evaluate
our estimates and assumptions on an ongoing basis. Our actual results may differ
from these estimates under different assumptions or conditions.
There have been no material changes to our critical accounting estimates from
those described in "Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition
and Results of Operations" in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended
December 31, 2021, filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on
February 28, 2022.
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                             Results of Operations

Comparison of the three months ended March 31, 2022 and 2021

                                             For the Three Months Ended
                                                      March 31,
(dollars in millions)                             2022                  2021        $ change
Revenue                               $         24.2                  $   5.5      $   18.7
Research and development expenses               64.0                     34.9          29.1
General and administrative expenses             20.2                     12.3           7.9
Other income                                     1.1                      0.7           0.4
Income tax expense                              (4.5)                       -          (4.5)
Net loss                              $        (63.4)                 $ (41.0)     $  (22.4)


Revenues

Revenues for the three months ended March 31, 2022 totaled $24.2 million, as
compared to $5.5 million for the three months ended March 31, 2021. The increase
of $18.7 million was due to revenue from the ARV-471 Collaboration Agreement
with Pfizer entered into during the third quarter of 2021.

Research and development costs


Research and development expenses for the three months ended March 31, 2022
totaled $64.0 million, compared with $34.9 million for the three months ended
March 31, 2021. The increase of $29.1 million was primarily due to an increase
in our continued investment in our platform and exploratory programs of
$11.0 million as well as increases in expenses related to our AR and ER programs
of $8.9 million and $9.2 million, respectively. The increase in spending over
all of our programs was primarily due to increased personnel and personnel costs
utilized across all of our programs of $9.2 million, including $3.4 million
related to stock compensation expense. Clinical trial costs and related drug
manufacturing costs increased by $15.6 million as we expanded our AR and ER
programs into additional clinical studies. Direct expenses related to our
platform and exploratory targets increased by $3.6 million as we continued to
expand the number of protein targets in the exploratory and lead optimization
phases and continued to make investments into our platform discovery efforts.

General and administrative expenses


General and administrative expenses totaled $20.2 million for the three months
ended March 31, 2022, compared with $12.3 million for the three months ended
March 31, 2021. The increase of $7.9 million was primarily due to an increase of
personnel and facility related costs of $5.5 million, including $2.3 million
related to stock compensation expense, and insurance, taxes and professional
fees of $2.4 million.

Other Income
Other income totaled $1.1 million for the three months ended March 31, 2022,
compared with $0.7 million for the three months ended March 31, 2021. The
increase of $0.4 million was primarily due to higher interest income of
$0.7 million from marketable security investments as compared to prior year due
to higher interest rates, offset in part by lower refundable research and
development credits from the State of Connecticut of $0.3 million. The Company
is no longer eligible to receive a cash refund for the research and development
credits in the State of Connecticut.

income tax expense


Income tax expense totaled $4.5 million for the three months ended March 31,
2022, compared with zero for the three months ended March 31, 2021, primarily
due to current income taxes resulting from revenue recognition for tax purposes
from our ARV-471 Collaboration Agreement and the capitalization of research and
development expenses incurred on or after January 1, 2022. Under the Tax Cuts
and Jobs Act of 2017, qualified
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research expenses incurred after 2021 are no longer immediately deductible for
tax purposes and instead must be amortized over 5 years for tax purposes. As a
result of these items, we expect to fully utilize our federal net operating loss
and credit carryforwards in the current year, resulting in current income tax
expense for the period.

                        Liquidity and Capital Resources

Insight


We do not currently have any approved products and have never generated any
revenue from product sales. To date, we have financed our operations primarily
through the sale of equity interests and through payments from collaboration
partners, grant funding and loans from the State of Connecticut. Since inception
through March 31, 2022, we had received an aggregate of $780.5 million in
payments from collaboration partners, grant funding and forgivable and partially
forgivable loans from the State of Connecticut, and raised approximately
$1.3 billion in gross proceeds from the sale of equity interests and the
exercise of stock options, including:

•October 2018: our initial public offering in which we issued an aggregate of
7,700,482 shares of common stock, for aggregate gross proceeds of $123.2 million
before fees and expenses;

• July 2019: the sale of 1,346,313 ordinary shares to Bayer AG for total gross proceeds of $32.5 million;


•November 2019: completion of a follow-on offering in which we issued 5,227,273
shares of common stock for aggregate gross proceeds of $115.0 million before
fees and expenses;

•September - December 2020: sale of 2,593,637 shares of common stock in an
"at-the-market offering" for aggregate gross proceeds of $65.6 million before
fees and expenses;

•December 2020: completion of a follow-on offering in which we issued 6,571,428
shares of common stock for aggregate gross proceeds of $460.0 million before
fees and expenses; and

• September 2021: issuance of 3,457,815 common shares to Pfizer for total gross proceeds of $350.0 million.


In May 2021, we entered into a lease for approximately 160,000 square feet of
laboratory and office space to be occupied in 2024. In connection with the
signing of the lease, and at our election to increase the landlord's
contribution to the tenant improvement allowance, we issued a letter of credit
for $4.5 million, collateralized by a certificate of deposit in the same amount.
Once occupied, the base rent will range from $7.7 million to $8.8 million
annually over a ten-year lease term.

In August 2021, we entered into an Equity Distribution Agreement with Piper
Sandler & Company and Cantor Fitzgerald & Co., as agents, pursuant to which we
may offer and sell from time to time, through the agents, up to $300.0 million
of the common stock registered under our universal shelf registration statement
pursuant to one or more "at-the-market" offering. At March 31, 2022, no shares
have been issued under this agreement.

Cash flow


Our cash, cash equivalents, restricted cash and marketable securities totaled
$1.4 billion as of March 31, 2022 and $1.5 billion as of December 31, 2021. We
had an outstanding loan balance of $1.0 million as of each of March 31, 2022 and
December 31, 2021.
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The following table summarizes our sources and uses of cash for the period
presented:

                                                                       For the Three Months Ended
                                                                                March 31,
(dollars in millions)                                                   2022                  2021
Net cash used in operating activities                             $       (57.1)         $     (39.0)
Net cash provided by (used in) investing activities                         8.6               (207.8)
Net cash provided by financing activities                                   2.5                  4.5

Net decrease in cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash $(46.0) $(242.3)



Operating Activities

Net cash used in operating activities for the three months ended March 31, 2022
totaled $57.1 million, primarily due to our net loss of $63.4 million, a net
reduction in accrued expenses and accounts payable of $15.6 million and a
reduction in deferred revenue of $21.2 million, partially offset by non-cash
charges of $22.3 million and a decrease in account and other receivables of
$19.1 million. Non-cash charges included stock compensation expense of $16.6
million, net accretion of bond discounts/premiums of $3.3 million, and
depreciation and amortization of $1.5 million.

Net cash used in operating activities for the three months ended March 31, 2021
totaled $39.0 million, primarily due to our net loss of $41.0 million, a net
reduction in accrued expenses and accounts payable of $9.1 million and a
reduction in deferred revenue of $2.5 million, partially offset by non-cash
charges of $12.7 million and a decrease in account and other receivables of $3.3
million. Non-cash charges were primarily stock compensation expense of $10.3
million, depreciation and amortization of $1.1 million and net accretion of bond
discounts/premiums of $1.0 million.

Investing activities


Net cash provided by investing activities for the three months ended March 31,
2022 totaled $8.6 million, attributable to maturities of marketable securities
in excess of purchases of $10.7 million, offset by purchases of property and
equipment of $2.1 million.

Net cash used in investing activities for the three months ended March 31, 2021
totaled $207.8 million, attributable to purchases of marketable securities in
excess of the maturities of marketable securities of $206.8 million and
purchases of property and equipment of $1.0 million.

Fundraising activities


Net cash provided by financing activities for the three months ended March 31,
2022 totaled $2.5 million, attributable to the proceeds from the exercise of
stock options.

Net cash provided by financing activities for the three months ended March 31,
2021 totaled $4.5 million, attributable to the proceeds from the exercise of
stock options.

Funding Requirements

Since our inception, we have incurred significant operating losses. We expect to
continue to incur significant expenses and increasing operating losses for the
foreseeable future as we advance the preclinical and clinical development of our
product candidates. In addition, we expect to continue to incur additional costs
associated with operating as a public company.

Specifically, we expect our expenses to increase significantly if and to the extent that we:


•continue a Phase 1/2 clinical trial of our product candidate bavdegalutamide
and a Phase 1b clinical trial of bavdegalutamide in combination with abiraterone
for the treatment of men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer,
or mCRPC, and initiate one or more additional
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Phase 1b clinical extensions of bavdegalutamide in combination with standard of care agents, in men with mCRPC;


•continue a Phase 1/2 clinical trial of our product candidate ARV-471 and a
Phase 1b clinical trial of ARV-471 in combination with palbociclib, and initiate
an additional Phase 1b cohort expansion in combination with a standard of care
agent, each in patients with locally advanced or metastatic ER positive / HER2
negative breast cancer and initiate a window of opportunity study in early
breast cancer;

•pursue a phase 1 clinical trial of our product candidate ARV-766 in men with mCRPC and launch a phase 2 cohort expansion trial planned for 2022;

•apply our PROTAC discovery engine to advance other product candidates into preclinical and clinical development;

•expand the capabilities of our PROTAC Discovery Engine;

• seek marketing approvals for any product candidates that have successfully completed clinical trials;


•ultimately establish a sales, marketing and distribution infrastructure and
scale up external manufacturing capabilities to commercialize any products for
which we may obtain marketing approval;

•expand, maintain and protect our intellectual property portfolio;

•hire additional development personnel, including clinical, regulatory and scientific personnel; and


•add operational, financial and management information systems and personnel to
support our research, product development and future commercialization efforts
and support our operations as a public company.

We had cash, cash equivalents, restricted cash and marketable securities
totaling $1.4 billion as of March 31, 2022. We believe that our cash, cash
equivalents, restricted cash and marketable securities as of March 31, 2022 will
enable us to fund our planned operating expenses and capital expenditure
requirements multiple additional years beyond 2024. We have based this estimate
on assumptions that may prove to be wrong, and we could use our capital
resources sooner than we currently expect. Our future capital requirements will
depend on many factors, including:

•the progress, costs and results of our ongoing clinical trials for bavdegalutamide, ARV-471 and ARV-766 and any future clinical development of bavdegalutamide, ARV-471 and ARV- 766;

•the scope, progress, costs and results of preclinical and clinical development of our other product candidates and development programs;

•the number and development requirements of other product candidates we are pursuing, including our other research programs in oncology and neurodegeneration;

•the success of our collaborations with Pfizer, Genentech and Bayer;

•the costs, timing and results of regulatory review of our product candidates;

•the costs and timing of future commercialization activities, including manufacturing, marketing, sales and product distribution, for each of our product candidates for which we receive marketing approval;

•revenues, if any, from commercial sales of our product candidates for which we receive marketing authorization;


•the costs and timing of preparing, filing and prosecuting patent applications,
maintaining and enforcing our intellectual property rights and defending any
intellectual property-related claims; and
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•our ability to establish additional collaboration arrangements with other
biotechnology or pharmaceutical companies on favorable terms, if at all, for the
development or commercialization of our product candidates.

As a result of these anticipated expenditures, we will need to obtain
substantial additional financing in connection with our continuing operations.
Until such time, if ever, as we can generate substantial revenue from product
sales, we expect to finance our cash needs through a combination of equity
offerings, debt financings, collaborations, strategic alliances and marketing,
distribution or licensing arrangements. Although we may receive potential future
payments under our collaborations with Pfizer, Genentech and Bayer, we do not
currently have any committed external source of funds. Adequate additional funds
may not be available to us on acceptable terms, or at all. If we are unable to
raise capital when needed or on attractive terms, we may be required to delay,
limit, reduce or terminate our research, product development programs or any
future commercialization efforts or grant rights to develop and market product
candidates that we would otherwise prefer to develop and market ourselves.

To the extent that we raise additional capital through the sale of equity or
convertible debt securities, the terms of these securities may include
liquidation or other preferences that adversely affect the rights of our common
stockholders. Debt financing and preferred equity financing, if available, may
involve agreements that include covenants limiting or restricting our ability to
take specific actions, such as incurring additional debt, making acquisitions or
capital expenditures or declaring dividends.

If we raise additional funds through collaborations, strategic alliances or
marketing, distribution or licensing arrangements with third parties, we may
have to relinquish valuable rights to our technologies, future revenue streams,
research programs or product candidates or grant licenses on terms that may not
be favorable to us.

Borrowings

In January 2014, we entered into an Assistance Agreement with the State of
Connecticut, or the 2014 Assistance Agreement, under which we borrowed $2.5
million. Borrowings under the 2014 Assistance Agreement were forgivable if we
maintained a minimum number of full-time jobs in the State of Connecticut for a
minimum period at a minimum annual salary. Effective in March 2016, the full
principal amount under the 2014 Assistance Agreement had been forgiven. While
borrowings under the 2014 Assistance Agreement have been forgiven, we remain
subject to an ongoing covenant to be located in the State of Connecticut through
January 2024. Upon violation of this covenant, we would be required to repay the
full original funding amount of $2.5 million plus liquidated damages of 7.50%.

In June 2018, we entered into an additional Assistance Agreement with the State
of Connecticut, or the 2018 Assistance Agreement, to provide funding for the
expansion and renovation of laboratory and office space. We borrowed $2.0
million under the 2018 Assistance Agreement in September 2018, of which $1.0
million was forgiven upon meeting certain employment conditions. Borrowings
under the agreement bear an interest rate of 3.25% per annum, with interest only
payments required for the first 60 months, and mature in September 2028. The
2018 Assistance Agreement requires that we be located in the State of
Connecticut through 2028 with a default penalty of repayment of the full
original funding amount of $2.0 million plus liquidated damages of 7.5% of the
total amount of funding received. At March 31, 2022, $1.0 million remains
outstanding under the 2018 Assistance Agreement.

© Edgar Online, source Previews

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“Behind the Blue”: Conversation with British President Eli Capilouto https://metroresearch.org/behind-the-blue-conversation-with-british-president-eli-capilouto/ Mon, 02 May 2022 08:00:07 +0000 https://metroresearch.org/behind-the-blue-conversation-with-british-president-eli-capilouto/ LEXINGTON, Kentucky (May 2, 2022) — University of Kentucky President Eli Capilouto is completing his 11th year at the helm of the state’s flagship land-grant college. This academic year, the university finalized and began to implement its next strategic plan: The UK Purpose. One of the key principles of this plan relates to how the […]]]>

LEXINGTON, Kentucky (May 2, 2022) — University of Kentucky President Eli Capilouto is completing his 11th year at the helm of the state’s flagship land-grant college.

This academic year, the university finalized and began to implement its next strategic plan: The UK Purpose. One of the key principles of this plan relates to how the institution works to “take care of its employees”.

In this episode of “Behind the Blue”, Capilouto explains in more detail how the UK is working to act on this principle with a proposed budget that reflects the priorities of the university, the hope and the enthusiasm that emanate from spring graduates entering the Kentucky workforce, as well as how a sophomore went battling a global pandemic.

“Behind the Blue” is available on iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher and Spotify. Subscribe to receive new episodes of “Behind the Blue” every week. The latest medical breakthroughs, research, artists and writers from the UK will be featured, along with the most important news impacting the university.

For questions or comments about this episode or any other “Behind the Blue” episode, email BehindTheBlue@uky.edu or tweet your question with #BehindTheBlue. Transcripts of this episode or other “Behind the Blue” episodes can be downloaded from the show’s blog page.

To find out what’s wildly possible at the University of Kentucky, click here.

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Transplants give children the confidence to dream big https://metroresearch.org/transplants-give-children-the-confidence-to-dream-big/ Sat, 30 Apr 2022 04:10:10 +0000 https://metroresearch.org/transplants-give-children-the-confidence-to-dream-big/ A16-year-old lejandra spent her childhood wishing for what she considered a “normal life”. She wanted to play football. Sleep without breathing apparatus. Take deep breaths. Maz Zisan, 18, went from regular mixed martial arts training sessions to being exhausted from a walk around the block, his overworked heart straining from the exertion. His dream of […]]]>

A16-year-old lejandra spent her childhood wishing for what she considered a “normal life”. She wanted to play football. Sleep without breathing apparatus. Take deep breaths.

Maz Zisan, 18, went from regular mixed martial arts training sessions to being exhausted from a walk around the block, his overworked heart straining from the exertion. His dream of majoring in mechanical engineering and earning his pilot’s license seemed unachievable.

For Maz and Alejandra, planning for the future went from dream to reality in 2021, when they became the first pediatric heart and lung transplant recipients, respectively, at NYU Langone’s Hassenfeld Children’s Hospital.

Alejandra received a new pair of lungs last May to replace those ravaged by cystic fibrosis, a genetic condition that has caused fatal damage to her lungs. In August, Maz received a new heart to treat hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), a congenital condition that causes the lining between heart chambers to thicken, limiting blood flow. HCM is one of the leading causes of sudden cardiac death in young people.

Before their transplants, neither teen dared plan too far into the future. But now they dream big, unconstrained by acute illness, and savor the simple joys of life.

“The second I woke up after surgery, I really felt something was different,” says Alejandra, who lives in Westchester County. “It was life changing. Breathing, it’s just… it’s awesome. I used to struggle to take tiny tiny breaths. Now I take deep deep breaths, and it’s just amazing.

Maz, too, is thrilled to regain his health and momentum. A martial arts enthusiast, he compares his new heart, strong enough to power his active lifestyle, to a performance engine in a Tesla. He trains weekly, rides a scooter to college classes, and works part-time as a pharmacy technician. “Before my transplant, a walk around the block made me tired. I struggled with depression. I wasn’t sure I would go to college or even be able to hold down a regular job,” says Brooklyn native Maz. “But I recovered quickly and I’m back in the gym practicing mixed martial arts with my younger brother. And I plan to become a pilot.

Both the pediatric heart and lung transplant programs are part of the NYU Langone Transplant Institute, a recognized leader in transplant surgery and research. The Pediatric Heart Failure and Transplant Program is led by Surgical Director TK Susheel Kumar, MD, Associate Professor in the Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery at NYU Grossman School of Medicine, and Medical Director Rakesh Singh, MD, Associate Professor in the Department of Pediatrics from the NYU Grossman School of Medicine. Dr. Kumar, who has performed dozens of pediatric heart transplants, is renowned for his expertise in the treatment of complex congenital heart disease. Prior to joining NYU Langone, Dr. Singh oversaw the care of over 150 heart transplant recipients.

“The second I woke up from surgery I really felt something was different. It was life changing. Breathing is just…it’s awesome. I used to struggle to take tiny tiny breaths. Now I’m breathing deeply, deeply, and it’s just amazing.”—Alejandra, 16, the first pediatric lung transplant recipient at NYU Langone’s Hassenfeld Children’s Hospital

Their patients receive the latest available treatments for heart failure before transplant, says Dr. Singh, and the program works with transplant centers across the country to review data and develop new protocols to improve patient care. Additionally, as part of the Transplant Institute, the Pediatric Heart Failure and Transplant Program benefits from the institute’s innovative research and recognized expertise, says Dr. Singh.

NYU Langone’s heart transplant program has been ranked the top program in the Northeast by the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients (SRTR), with the shortest wait lists and highest one-year survival among high-volume centers in the region. “Our colleagues who made this possible are also involved in the pediatric program,” notes Dr. Singh. “It allows us to think outside the box and overcome long-standing obstacles in pediatric transplants, such as increasing the number of donors or accessing children who might otherwise not be eligible for a transplant due to the severity of their illness.

Being part of a larger adult program also strengthens the pediatric lung transplant team, notes pediatric pulmonologist Eleanor Muise, MD, assistant professor in the Department of Pediatrics at NYU Grossman School of Medicine, who cares for children before and after lung transplant surgery. She is part of a team that includes Luis F. Angel, MD, Medical Director of Lung Transplantation, and Stephanie H. Chang, MD, Surgical Director of the program. NYU Langone’s lung transplant program is one of the best programs in the nation, based on a combination of high one-year survival rates and transplant speed, as indicated by the SRTR.

With advances in the treatment of cystic fibrosis, the need for lung transplants in children is less than before, notes Dr. Muise. But for young people like Alejandra who desperately need this treatment, there is a huge benefit to being treated by doctors in a combined pediatric and adult program. “At NYU Langone, the surgical experience in the adult program provides a tremendous benefit to the children we treat,” says Dr. Muise. Children who receive transplants at NYU Langone become inpatients at Hassenfeld Children’s Hospital on 34th Street, all of which are single-bed rooms with sleeping space for a parent or caregiver.

“NYU Langone was the best choice for my transplant,” says Alejandra. “The attention and care is so wonderful. I have never experienced anything like this before, and there are no words to explain how truly grateful I am to my doctors here. Pediatric patients also benefit of the Sala Institute for Child and Family Centered Care, which provides social support and cares for the emotional well-being of children.

“The transplant relationship is very special. My patients know that I am their person. I know what they like to eat, when they’re supposed to go to bed, because I want them to understand how important those things are to their health,” says Dr. Muise, who has a long-term relationship with his patients. “They make it so easy to love them, and I feel so happy when I see them feeling better.”

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Fishing industry calls on government to recognize toxoplasmosis as main threat to Māui and Hector’s dolphins https://metroresearch.org/fishing-industry-calls-on-government-to-recognize-toxoplasmosis-as-main-threat-to-maui-and-hectors-dolphins/ Thu, 28 Apr 2022 17:00:00 +0000 https://metroresearch.org/fishing-industry-calls-on-government-to-recognize-toxoplasmosis-as-main-threat-to-maui-and-hectors-dolphins/ Iain McGregor / Stuff Māui dolphins are the world’s rarest marine mammal and are found in coastal waters off the west coast of the North Island. The commercial fishing industry is calling on the government to stop treating it as the leading cause of death for Māui and Hector’s dolphins and instead focus on cat […]]]>
Māui dolphins are the world's rarest marine mammal and are found in coastal waters off the west coast of the North Island.

Iain McGregor / Stuff

Māui dolphins are the world’s rarest marine mammal and are found in coastal waters off the west coast of the North Island.

The commercial fishing industry is calling on the government to stop treating it as the leading cause of death for Māui and Hector’s dolphins and instead focus on cat droppings.

Industry lobby group New Zealand Seafood wants the government to recognize toxoplasmosis, a parasite transmitted by cat poop, as the main threat to dolphins.

He slammed the government for its “lack of action” following the New Zealand Nature Conservation Authority’s (NZCA) advisory in November that failure to address the threat of toxoplasmosis would probably lead to the extinction of the Hector and Māui dolphins.

An estimated 54 Māui dolphins inhabit the coastal waters off the west coast of the North Island, while Hector’s dolphins, found in the coastal waters of the South Island, number just under 15,000.

READ MORE:
* Dolphin advocates say government protections are fundamentally flawed
* The endangered Māui dolphin is a conservation priority – we shouldn’t let uncertainty stop action to save it
* Then there were 62: Late report of Māui dolphin deaths worries experts

In its advice to Conservation Minister Kiri Allan and Oceans and Fisheries Minister David Parker, the NZCA said it was surprised by statistics from a report on toxoplasmosis that showed dolphin deaths from the parasite exceeded fishing deaths by far.

He said the combined deaths from commercial fixed nets and coastal trawls for Māui dolphins were 0.12 per year, while for Hector’s dolphins they were 58 per year.

By comparison, toxoplasmosis-related deaths were 1.9 per year for Māui dolphins and 334 for Hector.

He recommended that a cat control program be “socialized with the general public” so that it can be launched by 2025.

He also recommended that ministers modify the five-year Hector and Maui dolphin research plan by shortening timelines and making it reflect more immediate goals.

Seafood New Zealand chief executive Jeremy Helson said the government’s apparent lack of action in response to the advice was concerning.

“After closing other areas to fishing in 2020, the Minister of Oceans and Fisheries has continued to consult on closing valuable fishing areas on the assumption that this will save dolphins, when they are well aware that banning fishing is not the solution.”

Helson said thousands of hectares of ocean have already been closed to fishing and more closures are being considered.

“These closures have had a devastating effect on fishers, many of whom have lost their livelihoods. It is unacceptable that ministers continue to treat fishing as the main risk to dolphins when their own view is that toxoplasmosis is the leading cause of death for Māui’s and Hector’s dolphins.

Ministers Kiri Allan and David Parker were approached for comment.

Egmont Seafoods owner Keith Mawson said the fishing industry is no longer the main threat to dolphins.

SIMON O’CONNOR / Stuff

Egmont Seafoods owner Keith Mawson said the fishing industry is no longer the main threat to dolphins.

Keith Mawson, owner of New Plymouth fish processor and retailer Egmont Seafoods, said the fishery had been an “easy target” in the fight to save Maui’s dolphins from extinction.

“They were very quick to close down productive fishing grounds for regional fishermen knowing there was a problem around toxoplasmosis.”

In 2020, the net ban set off the west coast of the North Island was extended to 12 nautical miles offshore, down from seven previously.

Since 2012, fishing vessels operating out of Port Taranaki have been carrying government-funded observers who have yet to sight a Māui dolphin.

Fishing restrictions on the west coast of the North Island prevent the use of set nets in much of the inshore fishery.

Andy Jackson / Stuff

Fishing restrictions on the west coast of the North Island prevent the use of set nets in much of the inshore fishery.

Mawson said that while commercial fishing may have been the main threat to dolphins 30 years ago, that was no longer the case.

“If toxoplasmosis is the major problem and the threat of dolphin fishing has been mitigated, maybe they should allow some commercial fishing in the areas they have closed.

“Especially in areas where there wasn’t a lot of certainty around the dolphin evidence.”

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Texts show details of Pennsylvania Rep. Scott Perry’s role in plan to void 2020 election https://metroresearch.org/texts-show-details-of-pennsylvania-rep-scott-perrys-role-in-plan-to-void-2020-election/ Tue, 26 Apr 2022 23:23:37 +0000 https://metroresearch.org/texts-show-details-of-pennsylvania-rep-scott-perrys-role-in-plan-to-void-2020-election/ April 26, 2022 | 7:20 p.m. Robby Brode Robby Brod is WITF’s Democracy Beat Reporter covering misinformation and the harm they cause to communities in Pennsylvania. Before coming to Harrisburg, he worked at WHYY in Philadelphia, WVIK in the Quad Cities, and Iowa Public Radio in […]]]>



  • Robby Brode

In this August 2021 file photo, Rep. Scott Perry, R-Pa., answers a question from a reporter during a press conference held by the House Freedom Caucus on Capitol Hill in Washington.  The committee investigating the January 6 insurrection at the United States Capitol has requested an interview with Perry.  The Republican lawmaker is the first sitting congressman the panel has asked to speak with.

Amanda Andrade-Rhoades/AP Photo

In this August 2021 file photo, Rep. Scott Perry, R-Pa., answers a question from a reporter during a press conference held by the House Freedom Caucus on Capitol Hill in Washington. The committee investigating the January 6 insurrection at the United States Capitol has requested an interview with Perry. The Republican lawmaker is the first sitting congressman the panel has asked to speak with.

The Jan. 6 select committee received text messages sent to White House staff by Pennsylvania Republican Rep. Scott Perry confirming Perry’s direct involvement in the Trump administration’s plan to nullify the presidential election in 2020.

In an exchange, on Dec. 26, 2020, Perry texted former White House chief of staff Mark Meadows: “Mark, I just checked as time keeps ticking. 11 days at 1/6 and 25 days at the inauguration. We have to go!”

Perry encouraged Meadows to speak to Jeffrey Clark, an assistant attorney general at the Justice Department who was sympathetic to Trump’s lies about voter fraud. The two had planned to plead for Clark’s promotion to Attorney General. A U.S. Senate report said Clark planned to say the DOJ was investigating Georgia’s election results, despite no evidence to warrant an investigation.

This message was one of multiple Perry sent to Meadows revealed in a file Friday in federal court by the special committee of January 6. The back-and-forth shines a light on Perry’s involvement in Trump’s plan to overturn the legal election results and stay in power despite his loss.

Trump met with Clark at the White House the following week and discussed his elevation to attorney general, but did not move forward after Justice Department officials and White House lawyers threatened to resign.

But Perry’s text messages to Meadows arrived while that plan was still active.

“Mark, you should call Jeff,” he wrote of Clark. “I just hung up on him and he explained to me why the senior deputy wouldn’t work specifically with the FBI. They will see it as [sic] not having the power to enforce what needs to be done.

Meadows replied, “Let me work on the assistant position.”

Perry replied two days later: “Did you call Jeff Clark?

Clark resigned from the DOJ a week after the January 6 uprising.

The committee did not subpoena Perry to testify, but he is the first sitting lawmaker to receive a request from the committee to testify.

Perry was one of eight Pennsylvania Republicans who voted against the Commission.

He called the investigation one of the “failures of the radical left” and “illegitimate,” although federal courts have repeatedly upheld his document requests.

Tuesday, CNN published texts Meadows gave to the Jan. 6 committee that show Perry appearing to be urging Meadows to push the debunked claims that Dominion voting machines were hacked by China.

“From a friend of Intel: DNI must instruct the NSA to immediately seize and begin searching for Dominion-related international communications,” Perry wrote to Meadows five days after the 2020 election.

He also accused then CIA director Gina Haspel of “covering up” for those involved in the machines.

Scott Perry House Freedom Caucus

Amanda Andrade-Rhoades/AP Photo

Rep. Scott Perry, R-Pa., discusses the infrastructure bill making its way through Congress during a press conference held by the House Freedom Caucus on Capitol Hill in Washington, Monday, August 23, 2021.

Perry, a fifth-term Republican who represents Dauphin and parts of York and Cumberland counties, began his term earlier this year as chairman of the House Freedom Caucus, a group of conservative House Republican members. The group formed in 2015 and does not make its members public. There are 43 U.S. House Representatives who have identified themselves as members, many of whom are members of President Joe Biden. the biggest detractors on Capitol Hill.

Members of the Freedom Caucus worked to advance Trump’s agenda.

Sometimes they used misinformation to do so, like when they called mail-in ballots “subject to fraud”. It is fake. Numerous independent studies and election security officials have found no widespread voter fraud in the country, including with mail-in voting.

According to the New York Times, Perry and other members of the House Freedom Caucus held regular calls and meetings with Trump and his top aides in December 2020 as they strategized to void the election.

Texts revealed by the Jan. 6 committee show Perry tried to pressure the Justice Department to substantiate false allegations of widespread voter fraud, including “allegations that Dominion voting machines had been corrupted.” Perry was identified as “particularly noteworthy” by the Committee, which recommended further investigation beyond his findings.

Hours after the U.S. Capitol was stormed by Trump supporters, Perry voted not to certify Pa’s results despite county, state and federal judges and officials from both political parties and election experts, having concluded that the 2020 elections were free and fair.

Berwood Yost, director of the Center for Opinion Research and the Floyd Institute for Public Policy at Franklin & Marshall College, said Perry’s voter fraud allegations do not match the facts.

“He was clearly one of the leaders who tried to overturn the election results. An election, I might add, that he won hands down,” Yost said, adding that he understands Perry’s rhetoric is a tool to “excite” his supporters.

“It’s really a dangerous thing for democracy. We have to trust our processes. And that’s a real problem continually questioning the legitimacy of an election that, frankly, has been very good for Republicans at all levels. It doesn’t make much sense.

In the court filing, the committee described Perry’s false allegations of voter fraud that it reported to the DOJ. He alleged that 205,000 more votes were cast than registered voters in the Commonwealth. In reality, votes in Pennsylvania were the same amount as registered voters who voted, according to a verification of the Commonwealth election.

Perry falsely claimed that more than 4,000 Pennsylvanians had voted more than once. But only three cases of double voting have been identified so far in Pennsylvania, and all three were attempts to vote twice. for Trump.

He also claimed that Democratic Gov. Tom Wolf and Secretary of State Kathy Boockvar were responsible for creating “confusion, chaos and fear” among voters of being infected with COVID-19 by encouraging voters to vote by mail rather than in person. Pennsylvania officials have repeatedly said they have promoted voting by mail to ensuring equitable access to voters during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Yost said Perry continues to spread disinformation about Pennsylvania’s election security, despite the claims’ unpopularity.

According to polls conducted last year by F&M’s Center for Opinion Research, 51% of respondents ‘strongly disagree’ with the eight PA representatives in Congress who voted against certification of the 2020 election results. of the Commonwealth. When Republicans in the state legislature were planning an investigation into the election, which is currently underway, 45% of those polled said they “strongly oppose” such an investigation. And, about 9 in 10 people said another event like the attack on the Capitol on January 6 would be “bad for our democracy.”

“When we ask about the most important issues facing the state, election integrity very rarely comes up. People care about the economy. They care that the government is so divided and the politicians are not doing anything,” he said. “I’m concerned that we’ve had multiple recounts in this state, there’s no evidence of that, that multiple challenges have brought that down.”

The 2020 primary and general elections in Pennsylvania were determined several times be accurate, legal and secured by various election security authorities both within and outside the Commonwealth.

Perry did not return a request for comment.

Pennsylvania Republican Lawmakers and the Attack on the US Capitol

As part of WITF’s commitment to standing up for the facts, and because the January 6 attack on the US Capitol was an attempt to overthrow representative democracy in America, we mark elected officials’ ties to the insurgency. Learn more about this commitment.

U.S. Rep. Perry (R, PA-10) is among 146 members of Congress who voted to overturn the certified result of Pennsylvania’s 2020 election, despite no evidence that would challenge it.

To see the full list of Pennsylvania elected officials who have taken action to fuel or amplify the voter fraud lie, click here.


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Bushra Abu-Helil’s research helps Norfolk poultry farmers https://metroresearch.org/bushra-abu-helils-research-helps-norfolk-poultry-farmers/ Sat, 23 Apr 2022 07:45:00 +0000 https://metroresearch.org/bushra-abu-helils-research-helps-norfolk-poultry-farmers/ Published: 08:45 april 23, 2022 Bushra Abu-Helil is a PhD candidate in zoology at the Quadram Institute at Norwich Research Park. Find out how his work on the microbiome of chickens helps address animal welfare, food sustainability and zoonotic diseases like avian flu. Every month, those who work at the pioneering heart of Norwich Research […]]]>

Published:
08:45 april 23, 2022



Bushra Abu-Helil is a PhD candidate in zoology at the Quadram Institute at Norwich Research Park. Find out how his work on the microbiome of chickens helps address animal welfare, food sustainability and zoonotic diseases like avian flu.

Every month, those who work at the pioneering heart of Norwich Research Park tell us how their work is shaping the world we live in. Read their stories here.


Bushra’s first pet was a chicken called Princess Zara Fidget, which inspired her to become a zoologist.
– Credit: Bushra Abu-Helil

What does your research consist of?

I’m trying to identify new biomarkers for poultry health and welfare. A biomarker is a molecule, gene or natural characteristic that we use to identify disease or stress. I use next-generation DNA sequencing, which determines which genes are present in an environment, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, which allows us to observe the magnetic fields around an atom, analyze the bacterial and metabolite composition of chicken faeces. This will allow us to learn more about the gut microbiome.

DNA sequences reveal communities of bacteria, fungi, yeasts and viral particles such as bacteriophages interacting with each other. It’s important for humans to have a balance for healthy development and a strong immune system – and that’s true for animals too. If we see an imbalance – or dysbacteriosis – in a chicken’s gut, this indicates that it is unhealthy or in need of support.

There is an important link between the welfare and health of an animal. Chickens under stress may have a “leaky gut”, in which compounds and bacteria leak through the intestinal lining and circulate through the body.

Why is microbiome research important?

People say you are what you eat – it’s true! Our diet can have a significant impact on our physical and mental health. Age, sex, genetics and environmental factors all have an effect on the microbiome. This is why it is important to find a biomarker that is robust enough to confidently detect stress or disease under different conditions.

My work is important because it is part of the World Health Organization’s One Health initiative, which seeks to combine human, veterinary and environmental health into one science. However, we shouldn’t just focus on chicken health, and we shouldn’t just focus on chicken meat from a human perspective. Also, we shouldn’t just focus on commercial farming and sustainability. All these elements are linked and must be studied together.

What global problems will the discovery of a biomarker solve?

In addition to providing a good indication of animal welfare, biomarkers can detect outbreaks of pathogens or zoonotic diseases, which are transmitted between humans and animals. The UK is currently experiencing a major outbreak of bird flu in which entire flocks have to be culled, meaning the meat cannot reach the consumer.

In addition to thinking about animals, we need to think about farmers. It’s their livelihood – and their margins are low. We want to make sure the chickens live a good life to keep them as healthy as possible, so farmers can make a living and people can eat the produce.

In research, there is typically a 15-year translation period from lab to real action. But farmers need solutions now. One of the reasons I want to do this at the Quadram Institute is to provide a direct benefit to Norfolk poultry farmers.

Why did you decide to pursue a career in science?

My first pet was a chicken called Princess Zara Fidget who lived in my aunt’s aviary in Essex. My mother saw my passion for animals and asked me what I wanted to be when I grew up. I told him that I didn’t want to be a veterinarian. My mother said, “You can be a zoologist.” At seven years old, that was the biggest word I had ever heard. It sounded fantastic.

I graduated in Zoology from Anglia Ruskin University in Cambridge, but struggled with exams and classes. Then I worked for the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and Cancer Research UK, where I realized it didn’t matter that I couldn’t write a perfect essay. What matters is that I am passionate, interested and enthusiastic.

What is your role in the Ecological Network for Racial and Ethnic Equality and Diversity (REED)?

I am vice-chair of the REED Ecological Network, a special interest group created in 2020 by the British Ecological Society, inspired by the Black Lives Matters movement, to provide support and mentorship to people of color in ecology and the environment. university.

The agricultural industry is the least diversified sector in the UK, followed by the environmental sector. I work with the likes of the Vincent Wildlife Trust, RSPB and the Natural History Consortium to improve equality and diversity and drive real change within sectors.


Bushra Abu-Helil broadcasting her radio show on More Muzik Radio

Bushra hosts her own radio show called Nature + Nonsense every Sunday on More Muzic Radio
– Credit: Bushra Abu-Helil

What’s the best thing about working at Norwich Research Park?

The Quadram Institute has state-of-the-art humanities technologies that I am able to apply to my poultry research. It really puts me ahead of the game. We are able to collaborate with other institutes like the John Innes Centre, Earlham Institute and UEA, as well as external partners like the University of Oxford. Your search is never limited here, especially when it comes to things like facilities or expertise.

The Quadram Institute was formerly the Food Research Institute, where Dr. Ella May Barnes OBE pioneered poultry microbiome research. I truly feel like I am standing on the shoulders of a giant.

What do you do when you’re not working?

Canoeing is my favorite activity. I live in Welney in West Norfolk which is in the Fenlands. When I go out in my canoe, I survey otter and eel populations as a volunteer with the March Level Commissioner’s Office, monitoring protected species.

I also host my own radio show called Nature + Nonsense every Sunday on More Muzic Radio. I keep my listeners up to date with the latest wildlife and environmental news from around the world.

And finally, which came first: the chicken or the egg?

In fact, we know that now. The egg definitely came first!

Bushra Abu-Helil is a PhD candidate in zoology at the Quadram Institute at Norwich Research Park. You can follow her on Twitter and Instagram @bushyb94. You can also hear her being interviewed on Radio 4’s Farming Today program on Monday 2 May.

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